Tag Archives: Main Road

ThrowbackThursday: Maunder’s Licensed Foodcentre, Lower Plenty

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to the Lower Plenty shops and Maunder’s Licensed Foodcentre at the corner of Main Road and Para Road, Lower Plenty, c.1976; known today as the Lower Plenty IGA or Lower Plenty Cellars and Supermarket. And alongside, another well known favourite, Thompsons Pharmacy, still going strong over 40 years later as well as the newsagency.

As always, we’d love to hear your recollections of visiting the Foodcentre, Thompsons, the newsagency or indeed any of the shops in this local shopping precinct.

Lower Plenty shops, c.1976 (Photo: EDHS collection)

 

Lower Plenty shops, Sep 2016 (Photo: Google Street View)

 

ThrowbackThursday: Willy Wonka’s Icecream Shop

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back in four jumps to the site of 820 Main Road, Eltham;

Photograph: J. Connor 2008

First stop is  around ten years ago c.2007-2008 where we find Eltham Fine Food & Ice-cream, otherwise known locally as Willy Wonka’s given its motorised feature above the ice-cream servery. Many a child would have stood and wondered at this feature whilst waiting for their treats.

Source: Copy held by Eltham District Historical Society of original photograph; photographer unknown

Next leap is 40 years back to the mid 1970s when the shop was then known as Marchant’s Milk Bar.

Source: From the Shire of Eltham Pioneers Photograph Collection (No. 702) held jointly by Eltham District Historical Society and Yarra Plenty Regional Library; originally donated by Bruce Burgoyne to the former Shire of Eltham.

Now we jump back 77 years to 1940 where we meet the original owners, the Burgoyne family standing outside their shop. The extension with entrance to the right was a recent addition which in later years was variously modified and blocked off.

Source: From the Shire of Eltham Pioneers Photograph Collection (No. 701) held jointly by Eltham District Historical Society and Yarra Plenty Regional Library

And finally back approximately one hundred years to its original version, J.N. Burgoyne’s Grocery Store and Post Office.

As always, we’d love for you to share your memories of visits to Willy Wonka’s (Eltham Fine Food & Ice-cream) or to Marchant’s Milk Bar.

Of course it is unlikely that many today will personally remember Burgoyne’s as it was back in its time but it’s great to see the heritage of our area still standing and still being used.

The original Burgoynes store as seen by Google Streetview, Feb 2017

Back to the future and more recently, the shop was known as Sweet D Lites though has since closed. Big changes are now in store for the original building with a development application, initially refused by Nillumbik Council.

In November 2016 the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) approved an application to allow the redevelopment of this property to provide two shops, building and works, including part demolition, alterations and extensions to this existing heritage building and construction of a contemporary addition with three, two-bedroom dwellings, including partly above the roof level of the existing heritage building. The Eltham District Historical Society was an objector at VCAT to this application.

 

 

ThrowbackThursday: Ansell and Muir’s Chicken Shop, Main Rd, Eltham South

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to 1960 Main Road, Eltham opposite the Lower Eltham Park, site of the current Fleur de Feliss flower stall. Many longer term residents of Eltham have fond memories of the chicken shop run by Ansell and Muir. Unfortunately the store stood within the 1934 flood zone and the property was unable to be be redeveloped. The former Shire of Eltham acquired the land and the building was subsequently demolished.

As always, we’d love to hear your recollections of visiting this store.

Eltham South Store later Ansell & Muir c.1960 [Photo from the collection of EDHS; donated by George W. Bell]
Current site of the former Chicken shop

 

ThrowbackThursday: Milkbar, Main Road, Eltham

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to the 1960s and the scene of disaster in every child’s eyes; a fire in the local Milk Bar. Who remembers this Milk Bar on Main Road near Arthur Street, and the fire? Do you recall what happened and did the business recover from the fire? Was it your hang-out after school? What was your favourite treat there? Please share your stories and let us know what your memories are of this local Aussie institution and the people that patronised it.

Fire damaged Milk Bar, Main Road, Eltham near Arthur Street, c.1960.

ThrowbackThursday: Eltham Feed Store

#ThrowbackThursday – Located today at the corner of Main Road and York Street is @LePineFunerals Eltham where many gather to share cherished memories and stories of loved ones recently departed. Today we share a memory of that site from circa 1980, scene of the former Eltham Feed Store located at 846 Main Road on the corner of York Street. No doubt many have memories of visits  to the store to purchase feed for loved pets and other animals and we would certainly like to hear your recollections of the store and its local characters.

Eltham Feed Store, 846 Main Road on the corner of York Street, circa 1980
Le Pine Funerals, 848 Main Road on the corner of York Street, Eltham, 20 May 2017
Looking west along York Street towards Main Road, circa 1980
Looking west along York Street towards Main Road and across to Alistair Knox Park, 20 May 2017

ThrowbackThursday: Shire of Eltham Centenary Parade

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to the centenary celebrations for the former Shire of Eltham and the parade held on April 10, 1971 as it progresses along Main Road. There is an enormous amount of detail captured in this image, some of it long gone, some still there and some just beginning. Look for the construction works on the Eltham Village Shopping Centre, site of the former Shire Offices at the corner at Main Road and Arthur Street.

Procession of parade floats in Main Road, Eltham, as part of the Shire of Eltham Centenary celebrations, 10 April 1971. (From the Shire of Eltham Pioneers Photograph collection (No. 4021) jointly held in partnership by Eltham District Historical Society and Yarra Plenty Regional Library)

Eltham Bakehouse Secrets

The following newspaper article comes from the Diamond Valley Local, Tuesday, February 16th, 1954.

It relates to a site at the corner of York Street and Main Road, Eltham. It contained a weatherboard shop and dwelling fronting Main Road and a brick bakery at the rear fronting York Street. The shop was at various times a baker’s shop and a grocery shop. These buildings were demolished in 1979 and replaced by residential units named Bakehouse Court.

Murder Mystery-3-2

“WAS WOMAN FOUND IN WELL PUT IN IT? 

Eltham Bakehouse was the scene of a drama whose details have never been cleared. Was the woman whose body 
was found in the old well inside the back part of the home murdered by her husband? Eltham bakehouse and residence now
 occupied by Mr Jim Arnett and family is 
one of the very old residences of Eltham.
 Mr J J Burgoyne, father of J N Burgoyne, 
so long known in Eltham in connection
 with the P.O. and store took over the bakery 
in 1896. At that time mystery was at its height, 
for the baker’s wife had been found down the well.

Did she fall, or was she pushed? No one knows.

But her ghost didn’t trouble the Burgoyne family, who had plenty of work on hand. The bakehouse supplied 20 large loaves of bread a day to far-scattered pioneers. Mr Burgoyne recalls his breadcarting days, and says that roads were rough. But they had metal on them. At least that puts them a few points ahead of how they stand today. 
When the bakehouse was sold six years later it baked 200 loaves a day.
 All of this is early history stuff, now being collected by the LOCAL. It has some wonderful stories, too.

Right, or Else 

Today, the quaint old house is still giving shelter and the bakehouse is equipped with an automatic “no-hands-touch-anything” machine which forms 2,000 large loaves an hour.
 What happens inside that bakehouse is worth telling. Strong and weak flours are blended to make dough. 
Strong flour alone would provide a loaf burst everywhere and misshapen. 
Weak flour bakes into a hard, miniature loaf.
 Just the right mix has yeast food added, then a malt improver, then vitamised powdered milk, then yeast, and finally water.
 The temperature of the dough is carefully regulated. If it goes over 82F. there is trouble. Ice water keeps it back in very hot weather. 
Acid calcium phosphate is added to prevent sourness during hot spells.  A lot of trouble isn’t it? But if the dough is one degree over 82F the oven will require 15 degrees more heat.
 The huge 18ft. by 15ft. Scotch oven is fired to 550F. Its firebricks glow all over. When the dough is ready a very wet cloth is scuffled over the floor of the oven. This produces steam and temporarily cools the sole of the oven to 500F. The burn on the sole of the oven is just taken out long enough to save burning the bottoms of the loaves.

Endless Care 

Loaves stay 35 to 40 minutes in the oven. Then they are turned out on to movable wire-mesh trolleys. Old J J Burgoyne would indeed be astonished
 if he could see what has been put inside his 
old bakehouse without changing the outside appearance.
 There are some thousands of pounds’ worth of the most modern machinery very much in use inside.
 Master baker Jim Arnett is obviously a man who takes a pride in the quality of the bread he bakes. The trouble and care taken is a revelation to anyone who hasn’t thought previously of what goes to make a loaf of bread.
 Formulas are exact. Records are kept of each bake.
 On big master sheets every detail of dough temperature, outside temperature, and oven temperature are kept. 
After so much care has been taken to produce good bread, it seems a pity that bread-eaters don’t keep it as carefully as they keep milk, for example.”