Tag Archives: Arthur Street

ThrowbackThursday: Gala Opening Ball,New Public Hall, Eltham, November 21st, 1941

Photo: Eltham Hall (Artist’s impression); Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser, 28 November, 1941,  p. 3.

Introductory Card, Gala Opening Ball, New Public Hall, Eltham, Friday 21st November, 1941 (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory)

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back 77 years to November 21, 1941. Our boys have been fighting in Europe and the Middle East for almost two years now and our district has suffered losses. The headlines in today’s Argus describe a terrific attack by the RAF on posts in Libya in which our airmen assisted.   In just 16 days the Japanese will launch a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, devastating the US Navy Fleet, and catapulting us into the Pacific War, right on our very doorstep.

It is just before 8:30 p.m., the sun having set just over an hour ago. A recent Gallop poll shows people are in favour of daylight saving time two to one but we will have to wait another year till it is introduced.  We have gathered in Arthur Street at the corner with Maria Street, near the base of the steps leading up to the swanky new Eltham Public Hall and Shire Office. The lights at the top of the steps bask us in their glow. It is overcast and 58 degrees (14°C), down from the maximum of 64 (18°C) at 3 p.m.. A few showers fell in the morning but it is dry now and predicted to be a fine day tomorrow, which is good as we have a big night ahead for us. For we are about to walk up the steps and enter into the new hall for the first time to attend the Gala Opening Ball which commences in just a few minutes, finishing in the wee hours of the morning. This is going to be a grand event; the official ceremony commences at 10:30 p.m.. Everyone is dressed to the nines and the air is full of excited chatter.

Shire of Eltham Office and Hall, cnr Main Road and Arthur Street, Eltham, c.1960 (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory)

The external walls of the building are constructed with Templestowe bricks which were selected for use because of their comparatively low initial cost and because such a brick facing reduces maintenance cost to a minimum.

In a few weeks the new Shire Offices will also be ready for occupation, and for the first time since Eltham was created a Shire in 1871, its municipal business will be conducted in surroundings befitting its dignity.

The combined structure of the Hall and Offices provide Eltham with a focal point for development, and is a fine building setting an example for future improvements to the township.

The design affords convenient  and appropriate entrances to both the public hall and the Council Chambers befitting their importance whilst achieving a satisfactory linking up of the two buildings.

The Municipal Offices consist of Council Chamber, general office, rate collector’s office, secretary’s office, engineer’s office and store room. They have been designed to provide for an additional storey when warranted by future development.

The entrance hall and Council Chamber are panelled with specially selected ribbon grained Queensland walnut with all other walls sand finished internally. A feature of the Council Chamber is a fine open fire place built of Ballarat tapestry bricks. The windows are of steel frames with a section glazed with broad reeded glass for privacy.

The whole building has been roofed with “Fibrolite” which will act as an insulator and will afford effective protection against the effects of condensation on the ceilings. Internally and externally, a pleasing and lasting effect has been achieved by the restrained use of color in pastel shades.

The site upon which the buildings stand will lend itself to a satisfactory garden treatment and development, and its elevation and central position in the Town of Eltham renders it a landmark around which the shire should maintain its recent growth and development.

The hall section of the building comprises a main hall, stage, two dressing rooms, kitchen, two cloakrooms and foyer. To provide for small meetings, the men’s cloak room and foyer are divided by means of folding doors.

The kitchen is fitted out with ample cupboarding, copper, stove and power points and is insulated with fibrolite wall board.

A specially constructed brick and concrete bio cabin has been constructed above the foyer. Flush walnut veneer polished doors have been used throughout.

Right on 8:30 the doors swing open and we are embraced by the surge of people.

Passing through the doors we immediately notice how clean and bright it appears with its white walls, and Tasmanian Oak hardwood floors; not a nail in sight thanks to the secret-nail technique stipulated in the design. The interior treatment of the main hall consists of a “Masonite” dado 4ft. 6in. high above which are fibrous plaster walls and a coved fibrous plaster ceiling.

Indirect artificial lighting has been installed by the introduction of scientifically designed fibrous plaster dome reflectors which are first illuminated by metal suspension electric light fittings. These lights are supplemented by wall bracket lights. The atmosphere created adds an element of glamour in addition to the many beautiful gowns worn by the ladies and smartly dressed men.

The acoustics have been catered for through the proportions of the building in conjunction with the elimination of inside wall piers and the use of “Perfotile” sound absorbing tile wall treatment. About 300 people are already in attendance yet conversation is easy to hear.

The stage is massed with flowers and shrubs carefully arranged by Mr. W. Allen; contrasting with the striking red, white and blue of the Union Jack draped at the back. A large bowl of delphiniums sits in front of the footlights.

Four years earlier, in September 1937, a group of ladies met to form a Ladies’ Committee to assist the General Committee in raising funds for the hall. Those present were Mrs Allen, Mrs Bowman, Mrs Hickey, Mrs Rains, Mrs Boake and Mrs Lyon. As there were only six present, they elected to remain in the interim as a Social Committee to arrange catering, etc., for the two dances that had been arranged for September 29th and October 30th of that year. Both those dances proved a great success. Mrs McAdie joined the committee in October. The Ladies’ Committee was officially formed at a combined meeting of the General and Ladies’ committees held on April 6th, 1938. Mrs Boake agreed to be President, Mrs Lyon as Secretary and Mrs Rains as Assistant Secretary. Other members included Mrs Browne, Mrs Forde, Mrs Jarrold, Mrs Bradbury and Mrs Taylor.

By 1941 their numbers had grown to include Matron Wilson, and Mesdames Andrew, Brinkotter, Cloney, Walker, Parsons, Crick,  Ballenger, Travena, Hurst, Shields and Le Brocq . A number of these ladies who will eventually move on and become part of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Eltham War Memorial Trust, have been working tirelessly organising events and raising much needed funds to arrive at this special occasion today.

As we take in the splendid surroundings we overhear many complimentary remarks about the wonderful job achieved by the members of the Hall Committee and the Ladies’ Committee which had supported the General Committee over many years. Plenty of refreshments are available; there are tables laden with cakes and other treats as well as another table of cups and saucers in a Blue Willow design for those wishing to partake of a cup of tea.

At 10:30pm there is a ringing of spoons on glasses. The official opening ceremony by the Hon. W.H. Everard, M.L.A. is about to commence.

Councillor A. Brinkkotter, secretary of the Hall Committee, introduces Mr. W. Hickey, the president, and in doing so remarks that Eltham has succeeded, after many long years of fighting, in erecting a new hall and civic centre which had been badly needed.
Mr. Hickey says that although for a long time it had looked as though the erection of the building would be postponed indefinitely, at last the new hall was completed.

“It took a long time to convince the Council of the necessity for a new hall and civic centre in Eltham,” he says. “The councillors, in looking after the interests of all sections of the rate payers, could not see that such a move was necessary. But finally the Hall Committee proved that such a move was not only advisable, but would prove a financial asset to the Shire.”

“This committee had to put down £1,500 in cash before the work on the hall began, and to enable the committee to do this, residents loaned them money free of interest for 12 months. In addition the committee has guaranteed to pay the Council £100 a year for the next ten years.”

“The borrowed money has to be repaid to the lenders, and I hope that the public will realise this and support the functions which have been and will be arranged by the Hall Committee to enable them to return the money as soon, as possible.”

Councillor E. Andrew, vice-president of the Hall Committee, extends a welcome to visiting councillors from Heidelberg, and adds that he is proud to be present on such an auspicious occasion. The Hall Committee has worked for years to provide the town with such an asset, and deserved the success which had crowned their efforts.

Mr. G. L. Chandler, M.L.C., extends his own congratulations to those who had been instrumental in having such a fine hall built. Of its kind, he adds, it is the best hall in which he has ever been.

“It speaks volumes for those people who have worked for many years for the hall. I know of no other place where the residents have handed over £1,500 for the erection of a hall and guaranteed the balance of the cost. You will always find the few who say ‘Time is not opportune.’ In these days you have to make your opportunities.”

“Before any town can advance, a civic spirit must exist in the residents, and I hope the people will support the Hall Committee which has the interests of this district at heart.”

The gathered are disappointed to learn from the Shire Secretary, Mr. C.L. Tingate, that the Shire President (Councilor Price) has been kept away due to illness. Mr. Tingate recalls the fire which destroyed the old Shire Offices at Kangaroo Ground in 1934 and the opposition which then existed to the Shire Offices being transferred to Eltham.

“Had it not been that this opposition was overcome, it is doubtful if we would have been celebrating this occasion tonight. This hall is the result of years of work by a committee which has had the desire and has used every endeavour to make the town go ahead.”

Councillor Braid tells the the assembled gathering that efforts had been made for years to get Shire Offices and a Hall in Eltham, and it was only when the present committee had made a concerted effort and a wonderful offer to the Council, that their object had been achieved.

“The South Riding Councillors have been trying to avoid increasing the rate, and they have managed to erect the Shire Offices without any increase,” he says.

And now it is time for Mr. Everard to speak. Laughter erupts when he recalls that a few years ago when talking to Councillor Braid, who was then President of the Shire, he had said “I’m sick and tired of hearing the talk about your new hall. I’ll be dead and buried before there is a new hall here!”

Mr. Everard also says that he considered it was due to the efforts of six Eltham people that he was first returned to Parliament.

“A meeting was called in the old hall to discuss my campaign, and although the weather was bad and I was late, this little group waited for me and began preparations which ultimately resulted in my election to represent the district.”

Mr. Everard then declares the hall open and expresses hope that “this red letter day for Eltham” will live long in the memories of those present.

Councillor Brinkkotter returns to the stage and comments on the wonderful work done by the members of the Hall Committee in the last two weeks, fixing up the seats – all armchairs – placed around the walls of the hall. He also expresses thanks to the Ladies’ Committee for its untiring efforts in support of the Hall Committee, and on behalf of the committee he thanks the Council, the architect (A. K. Lines and MacFarlane of 440 Little Collins Street and Greensborough), the contractor (A. E. Smart of Thomastown) and all the men who had worked on the building, along with the public who had so generously assisted with the expense.

And with the speeches completed, the band starts playing again and the floor becomes alive with couples dancing while others retire to the lounge chairs.

Those present include: Mr. and Mrs. D. Lyon, Mr. and Mrs. W. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Collis, Mr. and Mrs. H. Shields, Mr. and Mrs. W. Allen, Mr. and Mrs. J. Crick, Mr. and Mrs. E. Staff, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ballenger, Mr. and Mrs. Butler, Mr. and Mrs. G. LeBrocq, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kent, Mr. and Mrs. D. McAdie, Mr. and Mrs. S. Browne, Mr. and Mrs. McNeill, Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Gillberg, Mr. and Mrs. Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. J. Bell. Mr. and Mrs. A. Parsons. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Rains, Mr. and Mrs. L. Jarrold, Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Burgoyne, Mr. and Mrs. C. Hurst, Mr. and Mrs. J. Cresp, Mr. and Mrs. S. Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. A. Schulz, Mr. and Mrs. Bryce jnr., Mr. and Matron Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Sinclair, Mr. and Mrs. W. Squire, Mr. and Mrs. L. Iredale, Mr. and Mrs. H. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. W. Adlington.

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Tingate (representing the Shire President), Councillor and Mrs. E. Andrew, Councillor and Mrs. A. J. Braid, Councillor and Mrs. A. Brinkkotter, Councillor and Mrs. W. Clinton, Councillor and Mrs. J. L. Ryan, Councillor and Miss Lines.

The Hon. G. L. Chandler, M.L.C. and Mrs. Chandler, Mr. W. H. Everard, M.L.A.

Mesdames E. M. Boake, Allen, Pennefather, Northmore and Johnston.

Misses Beryl Northmore, Adele Peacock, Jean Glasgow, Olwyn Bryan, Mona Baker, Muriel Butler, Dorothy Butler, June Rains, I. Dudfield, Brennan, Scott, E. Bradford, Allen, S. J. Taylor, B. Simpson, A. Brookes, Somerville, Finlay, D. LaFranz, O. Parsons, E. Doney, I. Bond.

Messrs. R. Taylor, W. Boake, H. A. Davies, R. Marks, D. and J. Glasgow, Carrucan, Leo and Lou Brennan, A. Lowerson, G. Burges; K. Browne, L. Bryan, R. Wigley, L. Doney, W. North-more (R.A.A.F.), V. McColl, R. Finlay, Bryce, sen., Maclurkin, A. Smart, C. Brodie, and Dr. Bradbury.

References:

  • 1941 ‘CIVIC OPENING TONIGHT-LANDMARK IN ELTHAM HISTORY’, Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser (Vic. : 1940 – 1942), 21 November, p. 3. , viewed 15 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57495599
  • 1941 ‘OFFICIAL OPENING OF NEW CIVIC CENTRE’, Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser (Vic. : 1940 – 1942), 28 November, p. 3. , viewed 15 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57495679
  • 1941 ‘BIG MAJORITY FOR DAYLIGHT SAVING’, The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 – 1954), 13 November, p. 8. , viewed 18 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245362845
  • 1937 Formation of Eltham Public Hall Ladies Committee, 21 September 1937
  • 1940-1944 Minutes 14 March 1940 to 4 May 1944,Eltham Public Hall Ladies Committee
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ThrowbackThursday: Commercial Place, Eltham, May 1968

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we travel back in time to May 1968 and a place very different back then, an unsealed lane way running behind the Main Road shops from Arthur Street through to Pryor and Luck streets. It had no name. It did not even appear on the maps of the day until the 1980s. We do not have any stories to share, we are simply going to take a stroll together along the lane from Arthur Street to Luck Street and observe. The stories to be told here today are yours; your memories and recollections of a lane behind the shops before it became a Commercial Place in Eltham Town @mykindatown

What stories can you share with us all?

View from Arthur Street through to Pryor Street and beyond to Luck Street along the lane way running behind the Main Road shops (now Commercial Place), Eltham, c.6 May 1968 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
View from Arthur Street looking along Commercial Place towards Pryor Street, October 2017 (Google Street View)
View from Arthur Street looking along Commercial Place towards Pryor Street, January 2010 (Google Street View)
View from Arthur Street looking along Commercial Place towards Pryor Street, December 2007 (Google Street View)
View from Pryor Street through to Arthur Street along the lane way running behind the Main Road shops (now Commercial Place), Eltham, c.6 May 1968 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
View from Pryor Street to Arthur Street looking along Commercial Place, October 2017 (Google Street View)
View from Pryor Street to Arthur Street looking along Commercial Place, January 2010 (Google Street View)
View from Pryor Street through to Luck Street along the lane way running behind the Main Road shops (now Commercial Place), Eltham, c.6 May 1968 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
View from Pryor Street to Luck Street looking along Commercial Place, October 2017 (Google Street View)
View from Pryor Street to Luck Street looking along Commercial Place, January 2010 (Google Street View)
View from Luck Street through to Pryor Street and beyond to Arthur Street along the lane way running behind the Main Road shops (now Commercial Place), Eltham, c.6 May 1968. In this view you can just see the signs for Millets and Eltham Real Estate on Main Road ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
View from Pryor Street to Luck Street looking along Commercial Place, October 2017 (Google Street View)
View from Pryor Street to Luck Street looking along Commercial Place, January 2010 (Google Street View)
Detail from the 1966 Melways, Map 21, showing that the lane way was not marked. It appeared as a public ‘reserve’ in the 1975 edition with the provision of a carpark between Luck and Pryor Streets in the 1979 edition. Commercial Place was included in the 1990 edition. (From the University of Melbourne, Digitised Collections)

ThrowbackThursday: Main Road Shops, Eltham, Winter 1968

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back 50 years to the Main Road shops in Eltham. It is a Monday morning, July 15th, 1968 and the weather is fine but cloudy. People are off to work and school. The temperature is 41 degrees (5° C) with a high of 53 (12° C). Cars and people are navigating the roadworks which are now well under way to widen Main Road from Pitt Street to Elsa Court.

Looking north along Main Road, Eltham from just south of Dudley Street, 15 July 1968 (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory)

What memories does this invoke for you? One can certainly get a fuller impression now of how this area changed with the widening of the road.

 

ThrowbackThursday: Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 1954

#ThrowbackThursday – “Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have you been?I’ve been up to London to look at the queen!” Well, we are going to save you the trouble of going to London to look at the Queen because today we time travel back to 24 February 1954 and Main Road, Eltham when the Queen is visiting Eltham to look at us. A public holiday was declared to enable people to welcome Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh.

Looking north along Main Road just south of Arthur Street; Staff’s store on left, Shire Offices on right. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

Were you present in the crowd? Or were your parents? Do you have any photos? We would love to hear about your personal stories and any photos you may have of the event you would like to share.

Looking north along Main Road near intersection of Arthur Street. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Official welcoming party. Mr Frank Davis MHR (on far right). Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Official welcoming party. Mr Frank Davis MHR (on far right). Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Eltham Shire Offices, corner of Arthur Street and Main Road. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Looking south along Main Road just south of Arthur Street; Staff’s store on right. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Army Band assembled in Arthur Street. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
L-R: Mrs Arthur Bird (Dave Lyon’s sister); Bert Bredle , RSL President; Cr Griffiths; Cr Harmer; Cr Squire; Mrs Squire; Mrs Addison; Cr Stanley S. Addison
Dave Lyon’s house on north east corner of Arthur Street and Main Road now ANZ Bank site.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Councillors and others outside Eltham Shire Office and Hall (demolished 3 Nov 1970), corner of Arthur Street and Main Road. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
L to R: Mrs Frank Davis; Alf Davis; Mrs Alf Davis (head turned away); Mrs F.E. Griffith; Mrs E.P. Harmer; Mrs Ham; Mrs S.S. Addison; Mr C.G. Seear; Cr F.V. Squire; Cr E.P. Harmer; Cr S.S. Addison (Shire President, in uniform, former Bursar of the University of Melbourne and resident of Kangaroo Ground); R.J. (Dick) Ham, Shire Secretary; Cr Frederick E. Griffith (looking at camera, Australian flag at his left, died May 1979 in Queensland, formerly of ‘Banoon’, Eltham, former Shire President, buried in Eltham Cemetery
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

ThrowbackThursday: Barber Shop, Main Road, Eltham, 1972

Barber Shop and Lyon Bros Ford, Main Road, Eltham, c.1972. Pencil notes reflect the potential visual heights of the buildings which were being planned to replace these used by the Barber (later an Estate Agent) and Lyon Bros. Ford (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).

#ThrowbackThursday – Anyone in need of a trim or perhaps feeling a little lucky? Well today we time travel back to the period 1968-1972 where you are in luck; perhaps not so much with the lottery ticket but you can get a short back and sides and your smokes. Today we visit the Barber shop or for the more refined, the Men’s Continental Hairstylist, located directly opposite Arthur Street and adjacent to Lyon Bros. Ford. Previously situated around the corner past the Post Office near the railway station, the Barber shop is now front and centre in the town where all the men folk congregate (apart from the pub). It is 1972.

Who remembers sitting and waiting, listening to the constant banter between Barber and customer, most likely about the latest footy or cricket results; even the horses, a constant in the background on the radio. The smell of tonics and antiseptics and for the older fellows, the sharp acrid smell of a singe by candle; the buzzing of the clippers and the snip, snip, snip of the scissors. Layers of hair tumbling before you, gathering in your lap then falling to the floor beneath the chair, swept up in between customers; the classy reading material full of PIX magazines and then with a flourish of the cloth like a Toreador, you are beckoned to take a seat with “What are we having today?”, the next victim in line, defeated by your Mum or Dad in your attempt to emulate the flowing locks of John Lennon or Mick Jagger.

In 1968 you had to go around the corner past the Post Office to get your Tatts, smokes and a trim (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
By 1976 the Barber shop had gone and the building was taken over by a Real Estate Agent. The building has also since been replaced but has continued in its use as a Real Estate Agency for a number of businesses (Google Street View October 2017).

ThrowbackThursday: Bible and Arthur Streets, Eltham, 1967-1968

#ThrowbackThursday – In October 1967 the Shire of Eltham Historical Society was formed, which we celebrated with our 50th anniversary throughout last year. Coincidentally, 1967-1968 was also the beginning of much change around the centre of Eltham with the widening of Main Road and extensive road construction along Bible Street and Arthur Street. So whilst we are still in our 50th anniversary mood we will again today time travel back 50 years to visit a more quiet Bible street near the intersection of Arthur Street and then take a peek down the hill along Arthur Street at what is yet to come.

Looking north along Bible Street approaching the intersection with Arthur Street, Eltham, 1967. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)

Here we are looking north along Bible Street towards the intersection with Arthur Street in 1967. It appears a storm has recently passed through, the sun is shining but the road is wet; leaves strewn across it. No roundabout of course, that would have come in the late 1980s and note the horse rider; you probably would not see that today with cars zooming along, bypassing Main Road as they weave around all the parked cars whose occupants have walked down the hill to catch the train. These were quieter times.

Looking east along Arthur Street from the intersection with Bible Street, Eltham, 1968. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)

As we approach the intersection of Arthur Street we take a peek to the east, down to the right. It is now 1968. There is a new road surface and gutters and footpath but Arthur Street itself still only extends to the top of the hill, stopping at the future intersection of Doodson Court. Most of the houses in view have changed or gone.

The blue Valiant is parked outside what was no. 43, now part of a unit complex at no. 41. Immediately in front of the Valiant is no. 45, which has been a vacant block since before 1990. The gentleman in the hat holding a paper and walking up the hill is outside no. 39, now a unit complex and the old house on left is no. 37 (since replaced), which borders what is now the Walter Withers Reserve.

Note the other activity occurring in the picture. Apart from the gentleman walking up the hill, at the very bottom of the hill is a fellow mowing his lawn at no. 51 with his new Victa lawnmower (a classic today) and the spray of green grass clippings all over the road. And to the left of his property can be seen the pathway for pedestrian access linking Arthur Street to Lilian Parade. And up the hill in the distance outside no. 64 we see four children playing on the road. These were definitely quieter times.

Looking north along Bible Street approaching the intersection with Arthur Street, Eltham, Feb. 2014 (Google Street View Feb. 2014). Note that Google has not updated this view since February 2014 so the house at the north west corner of Bible and Arthur Street is still visible. It was sold in October 2015 for $1.26 million and demolished in 2016. The vacant block was sold in December 2017 with an asking price of $3 million.
Looking east along Arthur Street from the intersection with Bible Street, Eltham, Feb. 2014 (Google Street View Feb. 2014)

Addendum: Recently the Eltham District Historical Society was very privileged to receive a donation of nearly 300 images from Fred Mitchell, an avid photographer who captured every day life in Melbourne and the district around his home in Eltham of more than forty years from the 1950s onward. The images showcased today are part of that collection and were also featured in Fred’s book, Retro Melbourne published in 2014 by New Holland Publishers Pty Ltd. We are very grateful to Fred for his generousity.

If like Fred Mitchell you have treasured images from Eltham and district of years gone by and would like to see them preserved for posterity, please consider making a donation to the Eltham District Historical Society. If you wish to hold on to your originals, we are happy to arrange a loan where we can undertake a high resolution archival quality scan from prints (or negatives if available) and then return the originals plus a digital copy. Please refer to our Donations page for more information.

ThrowbackThursday: Cook’s Cottage, Arthur Street

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to Arthur Street, Eltham in the 1940s. Site of the current Eltham Town Square and Woolworths carpark, 70 years ago it was the very distinguished home of Mr and Mrs Ernie Andrew. The house was known locally as “Cook’s Cottage” as it reminded locals of that rather more well known cottage of the same name in the Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne.

Ernie Andrew died in 1950 and sadly not long afterwards Eltham lost a very unique landmark when the house was demolished.

A few of our older members can still recall the house – does anyone else have recollections of it?

 

Cooks Cottage, Arthur Street, Eltham, c.1940s – Ernie Andrews house, Arthur Street, Eltham c.1940s (now Woolworths carpark)
Site of “Cook’s Cottage”, the former home of Ernie Andrews