Tag Archives: A.I.F.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Pte. Kevin Francis Field, 28 Jun 1945, Bougainville, PNG

FIELD, Kevin Francis, Pte., VX144763
(KIA 28 Jun 1945, Bougainville, PNG)
Pte. K. F. Field (“Roll of Honor”, The Age, Friday, 31 August 1945, p4)

Kevin Francis Field was born 5 September 1917 at Kew, the second son of William and Mary Field of Montmorency. He was educated at Christian Brothers’ He enlisted at Heidelberg on 27 August 1940. His service record is currently not publicly accessible, but it appears that he was brought before a Court Martial on 23 September 1942. Kevin was a Private in the 57/60 Australian Infantry Battalion: a grunt, the work-horse of the Army. The 57th/60th Battalion was assigned to the 15th Brigade, 3rd Division in Victoria.

The battalion was initially used in a garrison role in Australia before being deployed to New Guinea in March 1943. The 57th/60th performed garrison and engineering roles at Tsili Tsili Airfield in the Watut Valley, while the rest of 15th Brigade took part in the Salamaua–Lae campaign, following which the 15th Brigade including the 57th/60th was formed up for battle in its entirety. Command was transferred to the 7th Division and the 15th Brigade including the 57th/60th then fought in the Markham and Ramu Valley and the Finisterre Range campaigns. Kevin’s battalion remained in New Guinea until July 1944 before being brought back to Australia for home leave, further training, and reorganisation.

The battalion was called together again to the Atherton Tablelands in Queensland. After a foreshortened training period, the 57th/60th received orders to re-join the 3rd Division which was at the time on Bougainville as part of the Australian II Corps, Australian forces having taken over responsibility for the island from the Americans in November 1944. The battalion embarked from Townsville on 1 January 1945 aboard the Fairisle, disembarking at Torokina, Bougainville, on January 5, 1945.

Following fighting around Slater’s Knoll the 15th Brigade moved forward and relieved the 7th Brigade in the southern sector of the island and shortly afterwards resumed the advance along the axis of the Buin Road, crossing the Hongorai River, and then the Hari and Mobiai Rivers before being relieved on 1 July by the 29th Brigade. During this time, the 57/60 took part in the Battle of the Hongorai River, as well as the advance to the Mivo River, undertaking a diversionary drive along the Commando Road on the left flank of the brigade’s main effort. Long (1963) describes the events of the advance towards the Mivo River:

“The 57th/60th Battalion, having completed its wide outflanking move on 16th June, was on the Buin Road and advancing towards the Mobiai. On the 17th a company of this battalion tried to outflank the enemy position between it and the Mobiai but was blocked by a Japanese position well north of the road. Next day it made a wider outflanking move and reached the road behind the enemy. There it was attacked but pressed on, and on the 19th the Japanese withdrew, having destroyed the field gun whose presence had prevented the tanks from advancing. In the following days the battalion thrust steadily forward, gaining a few hundred yards at a time, and on the 23rd was close to the Mobiai. There on the 24th a strong and determined enemy force was encountered with a 37-mm gun which scored three hits on the leading tank but failed to damage it. A heavy bombardment failed to dislodge the Japanese that day, but on the 25th they had gone leaving behind their gun, which had been buckled by fire from a tank.

Brigadier Hammer wished to advance to the Mivo before the enemy had recovered and reorganised. His plan was to relieve the 57th/60th Battalion on the Mobiai with the 58th/59th, move the 24th and 57th/60th to Musaraka whence they would advance with tanks round the enemy’s northern flank, the 24th to the Buin Road between the Koopani and Ivana Rivers and the 57th/60th to Shishigatero. The 58th/59th would create a diversion across the Mobiai and south of the Buin Road. By the 27th both leading battalions were in the concentration area and a track for tanks had been made on this flank from the Mobiai to a track—Killen’s—which ran just west of the Mivo to Shishigatero on the Buin Road.

That day when the 24th Battalion reached the assembly area from which the march to the Buin Road was to begin, the leading company found a party of Japanese in occupation, attacked them, killing nine, and dug in some 200 yards away while the artillery bombarded the enemy . Next day when the 57th/60th reached its area, farther forward, its leading company was attacked by about 100 Japanese as it was digging in. There was a fierce fight lasting half an hour in which 2 Australians were killed and 10 wounded and 11 Japanese dead left on the field. Nevertheless by dusk the battalion was packed and rationed ready to move off early next morning—29th June. All that night it rained, and in the morning there being no sign of the Japanese who had attacked the previous day, two companies, each with a troop of tanks, set off over boggy ground behind an artillery barrage which lifted 200 yards every eight minutes . By 4 p.m. the leading companies were on the Buin Road—their objective.”

Kevin was killed in action on June 28. The 57/60 was relieved by 15 Battalion on 2 July 1945. The battalion did not see combat again prior to war’s end. For Kevin and his family, the end of the fighting was so near, a few days at most – yet proved too far.

Kevin was remembered with the following notices published in The Age, Saturday, 7 July 1945, p10:

  • FIELD. — Killed in action, Bougainville, June 28, VX144763, Private Kevin Francis, dearly loved son of William and Mary, Montmorency, loving brother of Gerard and Majella, age 27 years. May his dear soul rest in peace.
  • FIELD. — In memory of Pte. Kevin, killed in action Bougainville June 28. His cheerful smile and kindly ways always remembered. —Inserted by Orme family, Diamond Creek.

The Age, Saturday, 14 July 1945, p10:

  • FIELD. — Killed in action, on June 28, Bougainville, VX144763, 57/60th Btn. Private Kevin Francis, dearly loved son of William and Mary, Montmorency, loving brother of Gerard and Majella, age 27 years. May his dear soul rest in peace.
  • FIELD. — On June 28, killed in action Bougainville, VX144763, Pte. Kevin Francis, loved friend of Mr. and Mrs. Cowan and family, Montmorency. One of the best. We will always remember him.
  • FIELD. — On June 28, killed in action Bougainville, VX144763, Pte. Kevin Francis. Always a pal. – Barbara and Ron Cowan.

The Age newspaper, Saturday 29 June 1946, p10:

  • FIELD. — In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Kevin Francis, 57/60th Batt., D Coy., killed in action Bougainville, June 28, 1945. Requiescat in pace. – Inserted by his loving parents, brother Gerard, sister, Majella.
  • FIELD. — VX144763, Pte. Kevin Francis Field, killed in action, Bougainville, June 28, 1945, loving friend of Joe Hefferman, Templestowe, R.I.P.

The Age newspaper, Wednesday 28 June 195046, p2:

  • FIELD. — Killed in action, Bougainville, June 28, 1945, Kevin Francis, 57/60 Batt., loving son of William and Mary, Montmorency; loving brother Gerard and Magella (deceased). R.I.P.
  • FIELD. — In loving memory of Kevin, killed in action at Bougainville on June 28, 1945, second son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Field, Montmorency. — Inserted by his loving grandfather, John W. Field.
  • FIELD. — In loving memory of Pte. Kevin Francis, VX144763, killed in action, June 28, 1945, at Bougainville. R.I.P. — Inserted by loving uncle and aunt, Eric and Kit Field, Kew.
  • FIELD. — In loving memory of Kevin, killed in action, June 28, 1945. Res in peace. In God’s care. Loved by all who knew him. — Inserted by Mrs. Neal, Nellie and boys.

Kevin is buried in Port Moresby (Bomana) War Cemetery, Papua New Guinea, Grave C1. F. 27.

FIELD, Pte. KEVIN FRANCIS, VX.144763 A.I.F 57/60 Bn. Australian Infantry
28th June 1945. Age 27.
Son of William and Mary Field, of Montmorency, Victoria.
His duty fearlessly
And nobly done
Ever remembered. R.I.P.

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Sgt. Theodore Feldbauer, 27 Mar 1945, Borneo

FELDBAUER, Theodore, Sgt., VX51733
(DOD, 27 Mar 1945, Borneo)
Vic. Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of VX51733 Sergeant Theodore Feldbauer (AWM)

Theodore Albert ‘Curly’ Feldbauer was born 15 October 1909 at Melbourne, the son of Theodore Henry (a naturalised German) and Jessie Margarette Feldbauer. The family moved several times during his childhood but before he was 20 he was living and working in the Eltham district. He became a well-known local sportsman. He played cricket for the Montmorency Imperials in 1929 and 1930 in the Eltham Cricket Association and excelled as a footballer and football coach. There are press references at the time to minor misdemeanours and accidents: evidently he was up for a brawl or two, but he was also able to do a recitation at a social night to launch the Eltham Girls Club in 1932. He married a local girl, Violet Amelda Teagle, in 1933, the 12th of 13 Teagle offspring who lived in Frank Street. Curly and Violet’s first child, June, was born the following year. By 1935 Curly was honorary secretary of the Research Cricket Club. He continued playing cricket regularly, mainly for Research, through till the 1940 season, after the war had begun. The girls started at Research State School in 1939 and 1940, respectively. They lived near Violet’s parents in Frank Street. Curly’s daughter, Valerie Waller recalls:

“We lived near my Teagle grandparents, who had a cow. Dad took over the milking. He would rest his head against the cow and sing to her. When he left to join the army, it took weeks before she would settle down to allow anyone else to milk her.”

Violet’s sister Margaret coincidentally married Ken Ingram in 1936, brother of Lester Ingram of Research who is also on the Eltham Honour Roll.

You can see from the photo that Curly was a well-built young man, 32 years of age when he joined up on 14 June 1940. Despite the army short-back-and-sides, the unruly hair on top took him to a height of just under 6 feet.

Curly’s service record is not yet accessible from the National Archives of Australia. Valerie Waller gives us some insight into that period between Curly joining and ultimately embarking for Singapore:

“Before he sailed to Singapore, Mum would travel by train, to Seymour, to spend a few hours with him. He sent her postcards and called her his “dear love”. His idea was that the sooner everyone eligible joined up, the sooner the war would be over. He had a great love for Australia.”

The Australian War Memorial records provide some bare facts about his military service.

Curly was assigned to the 2/10th Ordnance Workshops, Australian Corps of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, attaining the rank of Sergeant. Only months after his enlistment, Sgt Feldbauer was among the thousands of Allied troops captured by the Japanese in the fall of Singapore, February 14, 1942. His loved ones knew nothing of his fate until July that year, when his name appeared in the long list of those ‘officially missing’. A glimmer of optimism revived when he was officially reported as a Prisoner of War in mid-1943. It proved to be a false hope. Valerie adds:

“While he was a prisoner, Mum received a few postcards from him, not in his neat handwriting, but in block letter printing, to tell her he had received no mail or parcels from her. He must have felt we’d forgotten him, because, of course, Mum had sent lots of parcels and letters, and the Japanese hadn’t handed them on.”

Along with Craftsman Jack Herbert Butherway, Theo was one of over 2,000 Allied prisoners of war held in the Sandakan POW camp in north Borneo, having been transferred there from Singapore as part of B Force. The 1,494 POWs that made up B Force were transported from Changi [Singapore] on 7 July 1942 on board the tramp ship Ubi Maru, arriving in Sandakan Harbour on 18 July 1942. Sergeant Feldbauer, aged 35, died as a prisoner of the Japanese on 27 March 1945 at Sandakan Number 1 Camp. The Japanese recorded his death from Malaria. He has no known grave, but it is believed to be at Sandakan Number 2 Camp.

His death was not reported in Australia until some months later. Valerie noted:

“I will never forget the sound my mother made when she received the telegram saying Dad had died months earlier, ostensibly from Malaria, but he died during the march. The sound still haunts me.”

The family placed a notice in the Age (17 November 1945) ‘MRS. T. A. Feldbauer and Family wish to express their sincere THANKS for sympathy in the loss of their loved one. Sgt. T. A. Feldbauer, 2/10th Batt., P.O.W., Borneo.’

We don’t have details of his death but if Curly died of ‘illness’, as recorded at the AWM, it was because he was one of the thousands of Australian victims of the infamous forced Death Marches from Sandakan, January – May 1945, of which there were only six survivors.

Tuesday, 27 March 1945, when the Eltham Progress Association’s public meeting put in motion its plans to create the Eltham War Memorial Baby Health Centre, Pre-School and Children’s Library, was the exact date of Curly Feldbauer’s death at Sandakan.

Theo was remembered with the following notices published in The Age newspaper, Friday 2 November 1945, p8:

  • FELDBAUER. — Serg. Theo, VX51733, 2/10 Ordnance Workshops, died while P.O.W. Borneo- Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Teagle, Research
  • FELDBAUER. — Serg. Theo, VX51733, 2/10 Ordnance Workshops, died while P.O.W. Borneo- Mrs. R. Ingram, Research
  • FELDBAUER. — Serg. Theo, VX51733, 2/10 Ordnance Workshops, died while P.O.W. Borneo- His loving nieces and nephews, Dawn, Pat, Joy, Ted, Bill Teagle, Alphington.
  • FELDBAUER. — Serg. Theo, VX51733, 2/10 Ordnance Workshops, died while P.O.W., March 27, 1945, loving husband of Violet, father of June, Val, Theo, Albert. – Inserted by loving wife and family, Research.

The Age, Saturday, 3 November 1945, p11

  • FELDBAUER.— Sgt. Theo. A. Feldbauer, VX51733, 2/10th Ord W. Shop, killed March 2, 1945, brother of Henry (deceased), Mrs. V. Foster, Eric (deceased), loving husband of Violet, children Junie, Valrie, Theo, Albert, dad and mum. Always in our mind, in which we’ll never forget.

The Age, Tuesday, 6 November 1945, p8

  • FELDBAUER. — Sgt. Theo, VX51733, 2/10th Ord. W’shop, died while P.O.W. in Borneo, loved brother-in-law of Rita and Wally, uncle of Shirley and Brian. A hero at rest.

The Age, Wednesday, 27 March 1946, p10

  • FELDBAUER. — VX51733, Sgt. Theo, 2/10 Ordnance, who died whilst P.O.W., Borneo, on March 27, 1945. In proud and loving memory of our dear husband and daddy. A silent thought brings many a tear, For the one we lost and loved so dear – Inserted by his loving wife and children.
  • FELDBAUER. — VX51733, Sgt. Theo, 2/10 Ordnance, who died whilst a P.O.W., Borneo, on March 27, 1945. Not just to-day, but every day, In silence we remember. – Inserted by Edna, Charlie and family, Research.
  • FELDBAUER. — In memory of Sgt. Theo, VX51733, 2/10th Ord. Workshop, died whilst prisoner of war in Borneo, loved brother-in-law of Rita and Wally, uncle Shirley and Brain. Always remembered.
  • FELDBAUER. — VX51733, Sgt. Theo, 2/10 Ordnance, who died whilst a P.O.W., Borneo, March 27, 1945. He died that we might live. – Inserted by Mr. and Mrs. Teagle, Research.
  • FELDBAUER. — VX51733, Sgt. Theo, VX51733, died while P.O.W., Borneo, March 27, 1945. – Always remembered by his loving niece, Pearl.
  • FELDBAUER. — In loving memory of Theo, who died while P.O.W., Borneo on March 27, 1945. – Vin and Ivy.
Major Frank D. Stevens, RSL President and schoolboy Albert Feldbauer at the ceremony of turning the first sod for the Eltham War Memorial Infant Welfare Centre Building, 18 July 1950. Albert still retains the silver ceremonial shovel today. (Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, EDHS collection)

Theo is commemorated on Panel 28 of the Labuan War Memorial Cemetery in Malaysia and Panel 91, Supplementary Panel 10 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial. Like all the men who sacrificed their lives during the Second World War, his name was added to the original obelisk honouring the dead from the First World War and the Eltham Honour Roll. But the most meaningful commemoration is the actual fact of the Eltham War Memorial in Main Road, Eltham, where his son Albert, being the youngest child of the children of the soldier fathers attending a school in the district, officially turned the first sod and started the building process on that winter day in 1950 – the ‘constant reminder to us of those who fought for us and the little ones for whom they fought and died’.

FELDBAUER, Sgt. THEODORE ALBERT, VX.51733. A.I.F.
2/10 Ordnance Wksps. Australian Corps of Elec. And Mech. Engineers.
27th March 1945. Age 35.
Son of Theodore Henry and Jessie Margarette Feldbauer; husband of Violet Amelda Feldbauer, of Research, Victoria.

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Sgt. Cuthbert Douglas Dunlop, 22 Nov 1942, Gona, New Guinea

DUNLOP, Cuthbert Douglas, Sgt., VX15252
(KIA 22 Nov 1942, Gona, New Guinea)
Vic. Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of VX15252 Sergeant Cuthbert Douglas Dunlop (NAA)

Cuthbert Douglas Dunlop was born 14 September 1920 at Heatherton, the son of Reuben Cuthbert and Janet Dunlop. A farmer by occupation, he initially enlisted in the Militia Forces on 23 February 1939 and assigned Army No. 323730 with 46 Battalion. On 16 May 1940 he was discharged to the AIF and re-enlisted at Seymour. He declared his occupation as a labourer, his year of birth as 1918 and his father, Mr R.C. Dunlop of Yuilles Road, Mornington as next of kin. Cuth’s service file was updated on 6 January 1942, his father advising his address to Henry Street, Eltham.

Cuth was posted to the 2/14 Battalion at Puckapunyal, 21st Brigade, 7th Division. On 19 October 1940, the battalion embarked per Aquilania from Sydney, disembarking 25 November in Egypt where they were then transported to Palestine for further training, whereupon they located at Dimra, near Gaza, in January 1941. On 19 January 1941 Cuth was evacuated to No. 1 Australian General Hospital with an incised wound to his right hand, returning to his unit ten days later. In April, the battalion was sent to Mersa Matruh in Egypt to defend against a possible German attack during the Siege of Tobruk. At the end of May, the 21st Brigade was sent back to Palestine to prepare for operations in Syria and Lebanon against the Vichy French, commencing the night of 7 June. The fighting was ongoing for the rest of the month and Cuth was ultimately evacuated to 7 Australian General Hospital suffering from malaise from whence he was evacuated July 8, to 1 Australian Convalescent Depot. On 11 August he was discharged to 21 Infantry Training Battalion and then returned to the 2/14 four days later at Beirut, where the battalion was being used as garrison troops overseeing the repatriation of captured Vichy French to France. In early January, the 7th Division returned to Palestine, the 2/14 situated at a camp near Jerusalem.

On 29 January, the 2/14 embarked from Egypt to return to Australia, arriving Adelaide on 24 March 1942. Following a period of leave the battalion was sent to Yandina, Queensland for defensive duties and training. On 6 July 1942 Cuth was promoted to Lance Corporal.

A month later the 2/14 embarked from Brisbane bound for Port Moresby, arriving August 12, and soon found themselves fighting the Japanese on the Kokoda Track. Cuth was promoted to Acting Corporal on August 30, at which time they were fighting a rear-guard action with a series of delaying actions and fighting withdrawals. By the time they reached Imita Ridge their casualties were so great, the 2/14 and 2/16 were amalgamated to form a composite battalion of approximately 300 men. As the 21st Brigade readied to make a final stand, battalions from the 25th Brigade arrived to relieve them, and the composite battalion was withdrawn September 16th for Uberi. The 2/14 started the Kokoda campaign with 546 men. By the time they were placed in reserve, only 88 men remained, of which only three were officers.

By November, the 2/14 had been reformed at Koitaki near Port Moresby with 341 men. The 21st Brigade was sent in to help capture the Japanese beachhead around Gona on the northeast coast of New Guinea. Cuth was promoted again, to Acting Sergeant, 13 November 1942 but was killed in action just nine days later.

Gona was eventually captured December 9, and the battalion remained there until early January at which time only 21 fit men remained before being sent back to Australia. Cuth’s service file notes he was buried in the Gona area, Grave A13. On August 23, 1943 he was reburied in the temporary Gona War Cemetery, Plot D, Row A, Grave 9.

The following notices were published in the newspaper in memory of Cuth.

The Age, Monday, 22 November 1943, p5

  • DUNLOP. Sgt., VX15252 – In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Cuth, 2/14 Batt., K.I.A. New Guinea, November 22, 1942. Loved in life, treasured in death, a beautiful memory is all we have left. – Inserted by his mother, father, and brother, Harry and Mat.
  • DUNLOP. VX15252 – In loving memory of our dear brother, Sgt. Cuth, 2/14 Batt., K.I.A. New Guinea, November 22, 1942. Too dearly love to forget. – Inserted by his loving brothers, Jack and Len (5th Batt., V.S.R.).
  • DUNLOP. VX15252 – In loving memory of our beloved brother, Sgt. Cuth, 2/14 Batt., K.I.A. New Guinea, November 22, 1942. Sunshine passes, shadows fall, but loving memories outlast all. – Inserted by his loving sister and brother, Jean and Sid.
  • DUNLOP. – In loving memory of our dear brother, Sgt. Cuth, VX15252, 2/14 Batt., killed in action, New Guinea, November 22, 1942. To have you here in the same old way is our dearest wish to-day. – Jim and Con, and nephews Ron and Douglas.
  • DUNLOP. – In fond remembrance of VX15252, Sgt. Cuth Dunlop (A.I.F. returned), killed in action, New Guinea, on November 22, 1942. Remembered always. – Inserted by Ruby and Clarrie Smith (A.I.F. New Guinea).

The Age, Monday, 22 November 1943, p4

  • DUNLOP. – In loving memory of Sgt. C. D. Dunlop, VX15252, 2/14 Btn., killed in action in New Guinea, Nov. 22nd, 1942. Sadly missed by Maureen Massoud, Tewantin.
  • DUNLOP. – In proud & loving memory of our dear Friend, Sgt. Cuth Dunlop, VX15252, 2/14th Btn., who proudly gave his life for his country in New Guinea, Nov. 22, 1942. Always remembered by Pearl & George Massoud, Tewantin.

The Argus, Tuesday, 23 November 1943, p2

  • DUNLOP. – In loving memory of Sgt. C. D. Dunlop, VX15252, 2/14 Btn., killed in action in New Guinea, November 22, 1942. – I have a beautiful memory to treasure my whole life through. (Sadly missed by Maureen Massoud, Tewantin, Qld.)
  • DUNLOP. – In proud & loving memory of our dear friend, Sgt. Cuth Dunlop, VX15252, 2/14 Btn., who proudly gave his life in New Guinea, November 22, 1942. (Always remembered by Pearl & George Massoud, Tewantin, Queensland.)

Cuth was further remembered on the anniversary of his death with eight notices published in The Age, Wednesday, 22 November 1944, p6 by: –

  • “Gone is the lace we loved so dear.” – Mother, father, sister and brother
  • “In loving memory of Cuth, who lives forever in our thoughts.” – Bess and Len
  • “Memories of happier days.” – Jim (A.I.F.), Con and nephews
  • “To have you here in the same old way would be our dearest wish to-day.” – Loving brother and sister, Jack and Norma
  • “Sunshine passes, shadows fall, but loving memories outlast all.” – Jean and Sid Robertson, brother and brother-in-law
  • “To-day I am thinking of someone; darling Cuth., that someone is you.” – Sadly missed by Maureen Massoud, Tewantin, Qld. (Also, in the Courier Mail, p8)
  • “To know him was to love him.” – Always remembered by Pearl and George Massoud, Tewantin
  • “Loved pal of Clarrie and George, 2/14th Batt. Life moves on, but memories stay.” Ruby Smith, Panton Hill

Nine notices were placed in The Age, Thursday, 22 November 1945, p8; six notices in The Age, Friday, 22 November 1946, p8; five in 1947; three in 1948; four in 1949; three in 1950; two in 1951; his parents and brothers in 1953 and two in 1954 at which year, digital records are no longer accessible publicly through the National Library of Australia Trove website. Clearly Cuth was well loved and remembered by his family and friends.

Cuth is now buried in the Port Moresby (Bomana) War cemetery, Papua New Guinea, Grave C6. B. 23.

DUNLOP, Sgt. CUTHBERT DOUGLAS, VX.15252. A.I.F.
2/14 Bn. Australian Infantry
22nd November 1942. Age 22.
Son of Reuben Cuthbert and Janet Dunlop of Regent, Victoria, Australia.
Hearts That Loved You “Cuth” Will Never Forget

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Cpl. Alfred Charles Clerke, 2 Feb 1942, La Ha, Ambon Island

CLERKE, Alfred Charles, Cpl., VX23112
(KIA 2 Feb 1942, Laha, Ambon Island)
Vic. Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of VX23112 Corporal Alfred Charles Clerke (NAA)

Alfred Charles Clerke was born 22 July 1906 in London, the son of William Charles and Rose Matilda Clerke. A printer by profession, he was 33 years old and married to Inga Caroline (Nicholls) when he enlisted at Heidelberg on 25 May 1940. His address was listed as Bridgelands, Eltham. The Bridgeland Park Estate was established in the mid-1920s and consisted of Antionette Boulevard, Rodda Parade and Leonard Crescent. Harold and Inga were married in 1934 and from Electoral Roll records, it appears they settled in Bridgelands, Eltham, soon after their marriage.

Initially assigned to Infantry Training Depot, he was then posted to 2/21 Battalion from 15th Training Battalion on 16 July 1940. In August 1940 he was admitted to Camp Dressing Station Seymour with Pharyngitis and in January 1941 admitted to 106 General Hospital and then transferred to Albury District Hospital suffering from Septicaemia. In April 1941, 2/21 Battalion joined the 7th Military District at Darwin and on 22 May, Alfred was appointed Acting Lance Corporal, quickly followed on 1 June to Acting Corporal. Following the Japanese invasion of Malaya on 8 December, on 13 December, the battalion departed Darwin bound for Ambon, an island in the Dutch East Indies, now present-day Indonesia, disembarking four days later.

During the evening of January 30/31, 1942, the Japanese landed three battalions from the 228th Infantry Regiment and a battalion of marines from the 1st Kure Special Naval Landing Force at several locations on the north and south coasts of the island. By the afternoon of 31 January Dutch forces around Paso had surrendered. Outnumbered and lacking air or naval support, 2/21Battalion, which was guarding Ambon itself, was unable to prevent the advance despite determined resistance, and were pushed to the far west of the peninsula. Within 24 hours of the landing, Dutch forces on the island had capitulated. Meanwhile, B and C Companies of 2/21 Battalion at Laha Airfield were attacked on 31 January. Around 150 Australian soldiers and some Indonesians and Dutch were subsequently captured, and many were later massacred following a major Japanese offensive on 2 February. Alfred was reported ‘Missing’. His service file was updated following cessation of hostilities on 24 October 1945 as ‘Killed in Action’ on or before 2 February 1942 at Laha, Ambdina in the Battle of Ambon. The Dutch having already surrendered, the Australians followed suit on 3 February. Whilst Allied casualties were relatively light during the battle, more than 300 Australian and Dutch Prisoners of War were randomly selected and summarily executed by the Japanese near Laha Airfield. In 1946 this incident became one of the largest ever war crimes trials. As a result of the capture of Ambon, Australian fears of air attacks were realised when Japanese planes based at Ambon took part in major air raids over Darwin, Australia, on February 19th.

Alfred’s wife Inga died in 1945 at age 41 never really knowing what happened to her husband. Alfred’s service file is notated: wife deceased, daughter (Nora Ann) living with wife’s mother, Mrs (Inga Mary) Nicholls, Allandale, Strath Creek.

Alfred’s memory is commemorated on Column 2 at the Ambon Memorial, Ambon War Cemetery, Indonesia.

CLERKE, Cpl. ALFRED CHARLES, VX.23112. A.I.F.
2nd February 1942. Age 35.
Son of William Charles and Rose Matilda Clerke; Husband of Inga Clerke; nephew of Mr. G.E. Berry of Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Capt. Studley Manston Gahan, 17 May 1941, Tobruk, Libya

GAHAN, Studley Manston, Capt., VX48379
(KIA 17 May 1941, Tobruk, Libya)
Vic. Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of VX48379 Captain Studley Manston Gahan (NAA)

Studley Manston Gahan was born in Ivanhoe, 8 December 1913, the son of Walter Ernest and Alice Miriam Gahan. By 1924, the family had moved to “Derril,” Eltham, on the western side of Main Road near the present-day site of Shillinglaw Cottage where they remained till about 1960 when Walter died. The house was demolished in 1968 during the widening of Main Road.

Gahan home, ‘Derril,’ (left) c. 1905 and (right) March 1968 immediately prior to demolition

Educated at Eltham High School and Melbourne Grammar, in April 1937 Studley was engaged to Kathleen Elsie (Kitty), daughter of Lieut. Colonel and Mrs C.A. Mitchell of Cowra Avenue, Mildura. Studley was employed by the Bank of New South Wales, stationed previously at Preston, Mildura and Melbourne offices. He was living at Caulfield when he enlisted 16 December 1936 and allocated to the 57/60 Battalion. He received a commission as Lieutenant on 15 September 1937. On 21 April 1938 he and Kitty married at Melbourne Grammar School Chapel. He was promoted to Captain, 28 March 1940.

On 1 August 1940 Studley was posted to the 2/23 Battalion, A.I.F., embarking 16 November 1940 per Strathmore for the Middle East. The Battalion arrived in Egypt mid-December where it was reassigned from the 7th Division to the 9th Division in early 1941. Shortly after they were sent to Cyrenaica in Libya. A German-Italian offensive led by the ‘Desert Fox’, Field Marshall Erwin Rommel of the German Wehrmacht drove the forces to the port of Tobruk where the 2/23 formed part of the garrison during the Siege of Tobruk, which lasted 241 days from April 10. These men were nicknamed by Rommel as the ‘Desert Rats of Tobruk’, something that was to become a source of pride amongst the Australians in their defiance of the German military might. A policy of ‘making the besiegers the besieged’ involved undertaking numerous and aggressive raids into German lines by small groups of men. On May 17, Studley led 12 men on such a raid on a German defensive outpost (Scates 2013). War Diary records note Gahan was last seen at 07.30 hours. Six of his men were wounded but he continued to push on to the next position. He was never seen again. On May 28, 1941, Studley was reported ‘Missing’ as of May 17th. On 9 June, his status was revised to ‘Missing Believed Prisoner’ and on May 3rd, to ‘Killed in Action’. His body was never recovered.

Studley’s younger brother Neil followed him into banking and the Army. Lt. Gahan departed Australia with 2/29 Australian Infantry Battalion for the Malayan campaign. Having initially been reported missing, he rejoined his unit just two days before Singapore fell.  He became a prisoner of war of the Japanese, alongside many other members of the 2/29 and was interned at Changi and sent to work on the Burma-Thai Railway as part of “F Force”. Neil survived the war and retuned to Australia, his final rank, Captain, like brother Studley.

Scates (2013) writes of Kitty Gahan’s efforts to be heard as a war widow. She was one of a select few to be invited to travel after persistent requests on behalf of the War Widows Guild to be part of the official Australian party to attend the dedication of the War Graves Commission cemetery at El Alamein, Egypt, in 1954. He also observes that while standing beside a grave to secure that finality of loss had no equal, from the 1940s, memorial funds were generally put towards useful and enduring purposes and less towards sponsoring pilgrimages, a more common demand after the Great War.

The State Library of Victoria holds the Papers of Kathleen Gahan, 1929-1982, which includes a scrapbook of correspondence, photographs, postcards, press cuttings and other ephemera relating to Kitty Gahan’s visit. Scates describes Kitty’s pilgrimage and this scrapbook of poignant material, not just as a souvenir, but as Kitty’s own personal memorial to her husband. The final image in the scrapbook being Studley’s name, etched in cool white stone in the desert, on a panel to the missing.

The following notices were published in The Age newspaper in memory of Studley: –

The Age, Saturday, 9 May 1942, p2

  • GAHAN. – Captain Studley Manston Gahan, killed in action May 17, 1941, dearly loved husband of Kitty.
  • GAHAN. – Captain Studley Manston Gahan, VX48379, killed in action May 17, 1941, beloved eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Gahan, of Derril, Eltham, and brother of Neil (2nd A.I.F.), Lorrainer, Peter, and Kevin, aged 27 years.

The Argus, Wednesday, 17 May 1944, p2

  • GAHAN. – In proud and loving remembrance of Captain Studley Manston Gahan, 2/23rd Batt., who made the supreme sacrifice at Tobruk on May 17, 1941.

The Argus, Wednesday, 17 May 1946, p2

  • GAHAN. – In fond and loving memory of Captain Studley Manston Gahan, 2/23rd Batt., who gave his life at Tobruk on May 17, 1941. – At the going down of the sun and in the morning we will remember.

The Argus, Wednesday, 17 May 1950, p11

  • GAHAN. – In loving memory of Captain Studley Manston Gahan, and comrades of B Coy., 2/23rd Battalion., who made the supreme sacrifice, May 17, 1941, Tobruk.

Studley is commemorated on Column 91, Alamein Memorial, Egypt.

GAHAN, Capt. STUDLEY MANSTON, VX.48379. A.I.F.
2/23 Bn, Australian Infantry.
17th May 1941. Age 27.
Son of Walter Ernest and Alice Miriam Gahan; husband of Kathleen Elsie Gahan, of St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia.

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.

Eltham Roll of Honour: Pte Jack Herbert Butherway, 8 Jul 1945, Borneo

BUTHERWAY, Jack Herbert, Pte, VX37645
(DOD 8 Jul 1945, Borneo)
Vic. Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of VX37645 Craftsman Jack Herbert Butherway (AWM)

Jack Herbert Butherway was born 20 November 1918 at Clifton Hill, the son of Thomas James and Florence Mary Butherway of Clifton Hill, younger brother to Harry (UK 1911) and Tom (1914). His father was a coach/car painter by trade however work must have been hard to find as the family moved shortly after Jack’s birth to Kinglake West where his father sought work as a labourer, then on to Whittlesea as a sawmill hand. By 1924 Thomas was painting coaches again, in Collingwood, and around 1930 the family moved and settled in Falkiner Street, Eltham where Thomas initially continued as a coach/car painter but by 1936 had set himself up as a printer.

Educated at Eltham High School, Jack played cricket with several local teams. In 1935, playing for Diamond Creek, Jack was the star performer. Only just left school, Jack took six wickets for nine runs. The Advertiser said, “This lad should develop into a fine cricketer.” Coincidentally, he was a cricketing and football mate of Theo Feldbauer, though on opposing teams, and suffered the same fate as Theo at Sandakan. He won the best bowling average in 1938 for Lower Plenty and was also caught and bowled by Theo Feldbauer for Research. His brother Tom Butherway was a star football player for Eltham.

Before enlisting, Jack worked at Jack O’ Lantern knitting mills in Richmond. His service file is currently not freely available from the National Archives, but we know he enlisted at Royal Park on 16 July 1940.  Jack was assigned to the Australian Corps of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, A.I.F., 2/4 Field Workshop. At a function arranged by the Badminton Club held in the Church of England Hall on 23 January 1941, Jack was guest of honour and was presented with a money belt on behalf of the members. He was posted to 22 Independent Brigade Group Ordnance Workshop Australian Army Ordnance Corps, his rank Craftsman, when Singapore fell on 15 February 1942. Jack’s father, Thomas, died early June 1942 not knowing his son’s true fate. Jack was listed as missing in July 1942 and a Prisoner of War in April 1943.

The Australian War Memorial advises Jack was one of over 2,000 Allied Prisoners of War (POW) held in the Sandakan POW camp in north Borneo, having been transferred there from Singapore as a part of B Force. The 1,494 POW’s that made up B Force, were transported from Changi on 7 July 1942, on board the tramp ship Ubi Maru, arriving in Sandakan Harbour on 18 July 1942. Jack ultimately died, only 26 years old, a prisoner of the Japanese on 8 July 1945, at Ranau Number 1 Jungle Camp (near Sinarut). It was recorded that he was buried at Ranau Number 2 Jungle Camp (First Cemetery, near Japanese hut, used from 11 June to about 9 July 1945). Although Jack died young, his elder brother Harry kept his memory alive till 101 and is buried in Eltham Cemetery.

Even before the end of the Second World War, the citizens of Eltham began to consider an appropriate form of memorial for those from the area who fought and died in the Second World War. In 1943 the Eltham Women’s Auxiliary raised funds for the construction of buildings to be established on land to be purchased for the proposed War Memorial. On March 27th, 1945, the Eltham District Progress Association called a meeting of local people who in turn set up and registered the Eltham War Memorial Trust Inc. As a focus for the purpose of the memorial, the newspaper notice read: –

“Those who have had a member of their family in the fighting services will want to see that the form of a memorial we are concerned with is the one which will be a constant reminder to us of those who fought for us and the little ones for whom they fought and died.”

Jack’s name is one of eleven listed on the Eltham Honour Roll (Second World War) located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall. Whist listed in order of rank; Jack was the last of the eleven from the Shire of Eltham who made that ultimate sacrifice for us, during the Second World War.

The following notices were published in the newspaper in memory of Jack.

The Age, Friday, 2 November 1945, p8

  • BUTHERWAY. – To honour the memory of our pal, Jack, VX37645, 2/10th Ordnance Workshop, died P.O.W. in Borneo on July 8. – Inserted by the Eltham Cricket Club.

The Age, Saturday, 3 November 1945, p11

  • BUTHERWAY. – VX37645, Jack, died P.O.W., in Borneo, July 8. A great pal, sadly missed. – Inserted by the Eltham Fire Brigade.
  • BUTHERWAY. – VX37645, Jack, 2/10th Ord. Workshops, died July 8, P.O.W., Borneo. Not just to-day but every day in silence we will remember you, Jack – From all who worked with him at Jack O’Lantern.
  • BUTHERWAY. – VX37645, Jack, 2/10 Ord. W’shop, died July 8, P.O.W., Borneo. – Inserted by his friend, Lillian.

The Argus, Saturday, 3 November 1945, p20

  • BUTHERWAY. – VX37645 Jack, 2/10th Ord. Workshops, died July 8, P.O.W., Borneo. – Not just today, but every day, in silence we will remember you Jack. (From all who worked with him at Jack O’Lantern.)

Jack is remembered on Panel 29 of the Labuan Memorial in the Labuan War Cemetery. The Labuan War cemetery is located on the small island of Labuan (part of Sabah, Malaysia) in Brunei Bay, off the north-west coat of Borneo.

BUTHERWAY, Craftsman JACK HERBERT, VX.37645. A.I.F.
2/4 Fd. Wksp. Australian Corps of Elec. and Mech. Engineers
8th July 1945. Age 26.
Son of Thomas James and Florence Mary Butherway, of Eltham, Victoria.

◊         ◊        ◊

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

References
#VictoriaRemembers   #VPDay75
The Eltham Roll of Honour: Second World War

Read the stories of all the men from the Shire of Eltham who sacrificed their lives in the Second World War and to whom the Eltham War Memorial is dedicated.