Category Archives: ThrowbackThursday

ThrowbackThursday: Icons of Eltham, Main Road, Eltham, c.1967

A view of part of the original Shillinglaw farm acreage, c.1967. Shows the trestle bridge to the left, Eltham Tip in centre and the Eltham Shire Office prior to extensions and Shillinglaw Cottage (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to circa 1966-1967 and Main Road, Eltham, just north of Bridge Street where we cast our eyes northwest across the fields that in a few years time will be developed into the Eltham Town Park and later Alistair Knox Park. In the distance, to the right, we see the recently relocated Shillinglaw Cottage and further on, the new Eltham Shire Offices, which were opened in 1965. In front of Shillinglaw Cottage is what will be developed into Eltham Common, later the site for the new Eltham Library in 1994 but presently still dominated by the Eltham Tip. To the left and behind the tip we see the iconic Eltham Railway Trestle Bridge and beyond that, Eltham Central Park and what appears to be part of the Football Club pavillion or is it part of the former Eltham Swimming Pool?

Everything we see is on what was once part of the original Shillinglaw farm which covered some 30 acres bordered by Main Road, Bridge Street, the Diamond Creek and Diamond Street.

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ThrowbackThursday: Junction of Sherbourne, Para and Simms Roads, Briar Hill, 1967

Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the western side of Para Road adjacent to Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to November 3, 1967 to the intersection of Para Road and Sherbourne Road, Briar Hill; or is it? In fact, Sherbourne Road still ends at the railway overpass, in a T-intersection with Para Road and Simms Road is a T-intersection off Para Road a few yards down from the railway bridge. On the corner of Simms Road and Para Road is an older house, which belongs to Mrs Cameron. Her daughter married a man named Davey after whom Davey Street is named. But there is a bulldozer at work and a large section of land is being cleared and levelled. Work is under way to commence the realignment of Para Road and Sherbourne Road in preparation of a new railway overpass. The access to Simms Road will change significantly and Mrs Cameron’s house has its days numbered as it is about to become the site of the new Montmorency Secondary College, which will open in 1969. Where the two cars are parked is where the roundabout intersection is sited today.

Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the western side of Para Road adjacent to Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the eastern side of Para Road opposite Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the railway line opposite Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the railway line opposite Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the railway line opposite Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).
Preliminary construction work for the re-alignment of the Para Road, Simms Road and Sherbourne Road intersection prior to the replacement of the Sherbourne Road railway overpass bridge at Briar Hill, 3 November, 1967. Viewed from the railway line opposite Graham Body Works.
(Photo: Photostitch from multiple images on a roll of 35mm black and white negative film; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society).

ThrowbackThursday: Eltham Railway Station, 1983

A single carriage Tait train from Hurstbridge about to arrive at Eltham Railway Station at Platform 1; a Hitachi electric train waits at Platform 2 to depart for Flinders Street, 1983. (Photo: EDHS, digital photo-stitch of two separate photos from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to 1983 and Eltham Railway Station. A single carriage ‘Red Rattler’ Tait train from Hurstbridge is about to arrive at Platform 1 where it will shortly depart again for Hurstbridge. A Hitachi electric train sits at Platform 2 awaiting departure for Flinders Street. The last of the Tait trains were withdrawn from service in December 1984.

A Hitachi electric train waits at Eltham Railway Station Platform 2 to depart for Flinders Street, 1983. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
A single carriage Tait train from Hurstbridge about to arrive at Eltham Railway Station at Platform 1; a Hitachi electric train waits at Platform 2 to depart for Flinders Street, 1983. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
A single carriage Tait train at Eltham Railway Station at Platform 1 waiting to depart for Hurstbridge; a Hitachi electric train waits at Platform 2 to depart for Flinders Street, 1983. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Toot! Toot! The single carriage Tait train departs for Hurstbridge from Eltham Railway Station Platform 1, 1983. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Single carriage Tait train departing for Hurstbridge form Eltham Railway Station Platform 1, 1983. (Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)

 

 

 

 

ThrowbackThursday: Fitzsimons Lane Bridge Duplication, 1991

#ThrowbackThursday – Roadworks, what a pain, and there seem to be so many going on lately. In reality the short term pain brings long term gain. After all, imagine what Fitzsimons Lane Bridge would be like today if it was still only a single lane each way. So today we time travel back 27 years to July 1991 where we can see work in progress, craning the final steel and concrete section into position to connect the Templestowe and Eltham ends of the duplicated bridge.

Originally Fitzsimons Lane was the name of the road on the Templestowe side of the Yarra River; on the Eltham side it was known as the Eltham-Templestowe Road. The road is divided on the Templestowe side but not on the Eltham side. When the new bridge was built c.1966, the divided road was not continued in the Shire of Eltham as it would have required a significant widening of the cutting.

Installation of the final section to join the two ends of the duplication of Fitzsimons Lane Bridge, 6 July 1991.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Installation of the final section to join the two ends of the duplication of Fitzsimons Lane Bridge, 6 July 1991.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Installation of the final section to join the two ends of the duplication of Fitzsimons Lane Bridge, 6 July 1991.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

 

Installation of the final section to join the two ends of the duplication of Fitzsimons Lane Bridge, 6 July 1991.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Bridgeworks on Fitzsimons Lane across Yarra River, Eltham, 1991. The new lanes are now in place and final works are in progress.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Looking north across the Fitzsimons Lane Bridge over Yarra River between Eltham and Templestowe, c.1985. Turnoff to Candlebark Park on right. It can be seen that the road on the Eltham side has now been widened to two lanes each way, merging to a single lane to cross the bridge.
(From the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Looking north across the newly constructed Fitzsimons Lane Bridge over the Yarra River between Eltham and Templestowe, c.1966. It can be seen that the road on the Eltham side is only a single lane.
(Polaroid photo from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

ThrowbackThursday: Roadworks, Bridge Street and Main Road, Eltham, 1968

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to 1968 and the intersection of Bridge Street and Main Road. Roadworks are well under way for the widening of Main Road from Pitt Street to Elsa Court. Extensive works were being undertaken to revise the intersection of Bridge Street. As a consequence, traffic delays were an everyday occurrence.

Excavating at the corner of Main Road and Bridge Street, Eltham, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Reconstruction of the corner of Bridge Street and Main Road, Eltham, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Excavating at the corner of Main Road and Bridge Street, Eltham, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Reconstruction of the corner of Bridge Street and Main Road, Eltham, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Traffic delays at the corner of Bridge Street and Main Road, Eltham whilst surveyors check the alignment, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
New embankment on southeast corner of Bridge Street and Main Road, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
New embankment on southeast corner of Bridge Street and Main Road, 1968; Roadworks for duplication of Main Road
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)
Main Road duplication at intersection with Bridge Street, Eltham, 1968. Shows the Eltham Shire Office, the construction of Panther Place and the new section of Main Road which was to become the northbound lanes.
(Photo: ©Fred Mithchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society “Fred Mitchell Collection”, donated by Fred Mitchell)

 

ThrowbackThursday: Timber Railway Trestle Bridge, Eltham, c.1913

Trestle Bridge, Eltham, c.1912; note the Catholic Church in Henry Street and Shillinglaw Cottage visible in background

(from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

#ThrowbackThursday – Eltham today is just getting busier and busier; more housing and unit developments, more people and lots more traffic. And a stroll along the Diamond Creek Trail during footy season weekends near Central Park will encounter plenty of people watching the latest game; you would be lucky to even find a car park. Next time you wander along the trail or head down to watch a game, cast your mind back a hundred years or so and ponder what it was like. To set the scene, today we time travel back to circa 1913 to a point just beside the Diamond Creek, south of Central Park. As we cast our eyes to the east we immediately see two of the iconic sights of Eltham; the timber railway trestle bridge built just over ten years earlier and Shillinglaw Cottage in its original location and the Shillinglaw trees standing proudly in front. If you look carefully beyond the trestle bridge, past where the current Eltham Library now stands, you will also see a weatherboard building standing in isolation. This is the new St Mary’s Catholic Church on Henry Street near Main Road (or Maria Street). The church site had been relocated from further south along Main Road (near Wingrove Cottage) in order to be more central to the congregation following the shifting of the township away from Little Eltham and closer to the railway station. It was subsequently destroyed by fire in 1961.

Postcard of St Mary’s Catholic Church, cnr Main Road and Henry Street, Eltham which was opened 13 October 1912 and subsequently destroyed by fire.
(Donated by: Garnet Burges; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

ThrowbackThursday: Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 1954

#ThrowbackThursday – “Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have you been?I’ve been up to London to look at the queen!” Well, we are going to save you the trouble of going to London to look at the Queen because today we time travel back to 24 February 1954 and Main Road, Eltham when the Queen is visiting Eltham to look at us. A public holiday was declared to enable people to welcome Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh.

Looking north along Main Road just south of Arthur Street; Staff’s store on left, Shire Offices on right. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

Were you present in the crowd? Or were your parents? Do you have any photos? We would love to hear about your personal stories and any photos you may have of the event you would like to share.

Looking north along Main Road near intersection of Arthur Street. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Official welcoming party. Mr Frank Davis MHR (on far right). Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Official welcoming party. Mr Frank Davis MHR (on far right). Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Eltham Shire Offices, corner of Arthur Street and Main Road. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Looking south along Main Road just south of Arthur Street; Staff’s store on right. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Army Band assembled in Arthur Street. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
L-R: Mrs Arthur Bird (Dave Lyon’s sister); Bert Bredle , RSL President; Cr Griffiths; Cr Harmer; Cr Squire; Mrs Squire; Mrs Addison; Cr Stanley S. Addison
Dave Lyon’s house on north east corner of Arthur Street and Main Road now ANZ Bank site.
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
Councillors and others outside Eltham Shire Office and Hall (demolished 3 Nov 1970), corner of Arthur Street and Main Road. Preparations for the Royal Visit by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II, Eltham, 24 Feb 1954.
L to R: Mrs Frank Davis; Alf Davis; Mrs Alf Davis (head turned away); Mrs F.E. Griffith; Mrs E.P. Harmer; Mrs Ham; Mrs S.S. Addison; Mr C.G. Seear; Cr F.V. Squire; Cr E.P. Harmer; Cr S.S. Addison (Shire President, in uniform, former Bursar of the University of Melbourne and resident of Kangaroo Ground); R.J. (Dick) Ham, Shire Secretary; Cr Frederick E. Griffith (looking at camera, Australian flag at his left, died May 1979 in Queensland, formerly of ‘Banoon’, Eltham, former Shire President, buried in Eltham Cemetery
(Photo: Peter Bassett-Smith, donated by: Diana Bassett-Smith; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)