Category Archives: ThrowbackThursday

ThrowbackThursday: Official Opening, Eltham High School, October 13th,1928

Feature photo: Eltham High School, 1944 (donated by Gordon Tonkinson; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back 90 years to Saturday, October 13th, 1928. We have been invited to attend the official opening of the new higher elementary school building at Eltham along with about 1,000 parents and children.

The school was originally opened on January 26, 1926 with 60 pupils and Mr. John Stewart as headmaster. Classes were initially held in the State School building in Dalton Street and the public hall in Henry Street. Apart from guaranteeing sufficient pupils, the Education department also required the local residents provide an area of land of eight to ten acres and a cash guarantee of £1,200 though this was ultimately reduced to £600 given the land was purchased at £90 per acre. It has taken nearly three years of hard work by the community to achieve this aim but finally the big day has arrived, 12 months after tenders were first advertised, which cost £5,000.

The day is cast in glorious sunshine. With a pleasant breeze and a maximum of 58 (15° C), Eltham is looking its best. There is an air of gaiety and excitement about.

Unfortunately, those visitors who have arrived by train are somewhat unimpressed with the railway station surroundings. On the vacant allotment right alongside the station is an assortment of rusty kerosene tins-about 15 of them-and the fences adjoining are in a thoroughly disgraceful and disreputable state, and have been for some months. In addition, several of the trees at the approach to the railway have died for want of attention, and hoodlums-said to be of local extraction-have deliberately destroyed several of the barrels enclosing the trees. Not so long ago the nearby swings were also vandalised and what was left of them were removed by an indignant resident.

However, as we approach the school grounds, beautiful hedges of hawthorn in full bloom greet us before entering the gates. Just inside the grounds are row after row of quince trees, between the leaves on the branches the fruit beginning to show. No doubt a tasty treat will soon be provided for the boys and girls during breaks in the day.

Dotted about the school ground are small picnic parties enjoying life in the beautiful sunshine to the fullest extent. The sound of music supplied by a section of the Returned Soldiers’ Band from Anzac House.

In the marquee there are small tables dotted about with groups of people sitting around them. The tables are decorated with posies of early Victorian period made with forget-me-nots, daisies, picotees, heavenly blue, stock and wallflowers. The posies are the handiwork of Mrs. H. Rutter, wife of the president of the Eltham Shire, and the sweet-smelling blooms come from the beautiful garden at “Yarra Brae,” Eltham, the home of Cr. and Mrs. Rutter. They are greatly admired and sought after. As we cast our eyes further around the scene we see a group of children chatting with Mrs. Hooley (nee Miss Sweeney), a former teacher at the State School in Dalton Street.

In the lead up to today’s carnival, a number of people have been struck down with the flu, including various committee members; Mr. John Stewart, the headmaster, amongst them. Fortunately the good weather has invigorated him sufficiently well enough to join us but disappointingly, the Governor of Victoria, Lord Somers, who was intended to perform the opening ceremony has also been laid low and forbidden to leave Government House. In place of His Excellency, we learn that Sir William Irvine, Lieutenant-Governor and a fellow local Eltham resident has agreed to step in.

We also hear word that Cr. H. Rutter, president of the shire, was called away unexpectedly to England earlier in the week to fulfill an important business engagement in connection with the firm with which he is associated. The acting president, Cr. A. H. Price, will stand in to represent him.

An interesting little ceremony is now taking place near the flag pole. Mr. Stewart is announcing that Mrs. George Phillips, of Eltham, has presented an Australian flag to the school. The gift, remarks Mr. Stewart, is a most acceptable one, and it is a kindly and generous act. Mr Stewart requests Mrs. Phillips unfurl the flag and cheers arise from the onlookers as the new flag flutters bravely in the breeze at the top of the pole.

A sports carnival has also commenced for the boys and girls prior to the arrival of Sir William Irvine. It is scheduled to run throughout the afternoon, interspersed among other activities.

ELTHAM HIGHER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL which was officially opened on October 13, 1928. (1928 ‘ELTHAM HIGHER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’, Advertiser (Hurstbridge, Vic. : 1922 – 1939), 19 October, p. 2. (AFTERNOON.))

Punctual to time, Sir William Irvine arrives and is greeted with cheers as he, in company with Mr. J. Lemmon (Minister of Education), Mr. W. H. Everard, M.L.A., and Mr. C. Hansen (Director of Education) take up their positions at the entrance doors of the school whilst the band plays the National Anthem. Also present are Mr. H. G. Fryer (president of the Teachers Union), and Councillor A. H. Price (representing the Eltham Shire Council).

Upon completion of the National Anthem, Mr. Stewart apologises for the absence of Cr. Rutter but states it has afforded him the pleasure of welcoming Sir William Irvine, who had so kindly assented, at very short notice, to take the place of Lord Somers, and whose presence at the gathering had been looked forward to by residents of Eltham.  Mr. Stewart says he believes Sir William Irvine would ably fill the gap caused by the absence of Lord Somers, which is met with applause by those standing around us.

Mr. Lemmon, is next to speak and he too is received with cheers. He also thanks Sir William Irvine, who has come at such short notice to take the place of His Excellency, Lord Somers, and whose inability to attend is greatly regretted. He expresses hope on behalf of all of us in attendance that the illness of the Governor would be of short duration; to which several people call out “Hear, Hear!” Mr. Lemmon expresses his own pleasure to be present in order to take part in the opening celebrations connected with the Eltham Higher Elementary School. He is pleased to see that the representative for the district, Mr. W. H. Everard, is out and about again, which is also greeted by the crowd with a “Hear, hear!” He states that Mr. Everard has well and faithfully represented our electorate for the best part of a decade, and was a man who looked well after the interests of the people whom he represented. More applause follows. He continues to state Eltham is one of 48 similar schools scattered throughout the State in addition to 38 high schools. We are told that only 25 years ago pupils received no more than an elementary education at the hands of the State, whereas today students to the number of 13,000 are catered for in the higher elementary and high schools. The cost of education had increased during that period from £750,000 annually to £3,000,000. Mr Lemmon says that the amount might seem large, but in his opinion, it is money well spent.

Mr Lemmon then congratulates the school committee on the excellent work it has done, and he trusts that parents will also take an active interest in the school and those who attend, allowing the latter to remain in school after they have attained the age of wage-earners. He recalls he has often heard the glories of Eltham spoken of, and from what he has seen of the place today, the encomiums passed thereon are well justified and deserved. This is met with much applause.

Mr Lemmon continues with a reference to one of the greatest men who had ever given his services to the empire, the late Lord Haldane, who had said that the purpose of education was to develop an appreciation of culture for culture’s sake, and also to further the application of science to industry. He reminds us that Lord Haldane had further said that a democracy which failed to provide equality of educational opportunity, was not a real democracy at all.

Mr. Lemmon concludes his remarks saying it is the wish and desire of those entrusted with the education of our boys and girls in Victoria to carry out those fundamental principles which had been advocated by Lord Haldane, who had been one of the greatest educationalists the world had ever possessed.

Sir William Irvine now steps forward and addresses the gathering.

“Fellow citizens of Eltham,” he starts with. Even though he regrets very much the cause for him being among us this afternoon, he feels a distinct honour to be called upon to open one of the higher elementary schools in this State. He says he is an enthusiast in all matters pertaining to education, and in his opinion it did not matter if the cost of education was increasing, as he feels quite sure that the return would be well worth it.

“I believe that the seeds you sow in the minds of the young produces the most certain results.”

“Such schools present the young with opportunities of rising not merely to technical and industrial efficiency, so that they may make more money or higher wages. That is a useful object and may be the aim of the majority who enter this and other schools but there is something higher.”

The more chances given to the rising generation in the way of education, says Sir William, the better for all concerned. The community will undoubtedly benefit thereby in the long run. Let the children be well equipped for a calling in life, and it would be well for all concerned. The new school at Eltham opens the door to higher education, and it is a door open to rich and poor alike. No matter how much people might disagree so far as political issues are concerned, they could all agree on the point that young people should be given every available opportunity to rise to greater intellectual levels. He continues in saying there need be no cause for apprehension, even if the cost of education rose to an even greater extent-than the figures which have been quoted this afternoon. It was the aim of education to bring the minds of people into paths of thought leading to vistas of intellectual truth and beauty. Secondary education should be a means of drawing out the creative intellect of the youth of this fair country, in order that their efforts would lead towards the benefit of all, so that their minds might be uplifted above the sordid cares of ordinary life, and so that they might enjoy the priceless heritage of English history. By possessing courage, energy and determination there was no goal which might not be reached.

Sir William then declares, with great pleasure indeed, the Higher Elementary School at Eltham opened to resounding cheers.

Mr. Lemmon calls for three cheers for the new school, which are heartily given, mostly from the lusty throats of youthful Elthamites and boys and girls from adjacent towns.

Mr. Everard, M.L.A., expresses pleasure at being present at the afternoon’s function-the first official function he has been able to attend for 10 weeks. He desires to thank the good people of Eltham and throughout the other parts of the electorate of Evelyn for their kindly thoughts of him and the many inquiries made during his time of sickness and trouble. The kindly feelings and thoughtfulness of the people are greatly appreciated by him. He is also pleased to see present among others, Mr. Hansen, the Director of Education and Mrs. Hansen. He states it is necessary for men to have their wives with them “sometimes,” in order to look after them, which is met with laughter. Whilst regretting the unexpected and the regretted absence of Lord Somers, he says it is gratifying to have in our midst such a man as Sir William Irvine, who had responded to the call at short notice.

Someone in the crowd calls out for a singing of “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,” when reference is made to the Lieutenant-Governor, but the response is somewhat disappointing, the popular air being started in different keys in various parts of the crowd resulting in discord.

Mr. Everard then calls for a cheer for Sir William, which is heartily given. Mr. Everard raises another laugh by responding “Thanks, that’s all right. It was better than the song.”

At the conclusion of these proceedings the party undertakes a tour of inspection of the class-rooms, afternoon tea following in a marquee. Groups of four are allotted to each table, and home delicacies in the shape of scones, sandwiches and cakes are partaken of under the chairmanship of Mr. Stewart.

Mr. Hansen says he thought the time an opportune one on which occasion might be taken to return thanks to all those who had worked so hard in order to make the opening the success it undoubtedly is. The attendance of such a large crowd shows that the people are taking an interest in their new school. He says we have an ideal foundation for a complete plan of a new building, which he trusts would eventually develop into a high school. The school has a fine body of teachers capable of imparting the necessary instruction to the boys and girls who attend the school. Mr Hansen continues by saying when he first saw the site on which the school was to be erected, he expressed the opinion that it was one of the beauty spots of Eltham, and he was of the same opinion still.

Mr. Hansen explains that the school building, designed with a Moorish style architecture is the only one of its kind in the State. Eighty children are at present attending the school and it has accommodation for more than 100 pupils.

Mr Hansen also thanks the ladies of Eltham, particularly for the energetic and valuable part they had taken in connection with the school opening, and he moves accordingly.

Mr. Everard seconds the vote of thanks, which is carried with much acclamation.

Mr. Stewart makes a suitable response on behalf of the ladies, who had worked hard from the inception of the movement right up to today. He notes Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Burgoyne were “the chief conspirators,” which is greeted with laughter. He adds that these ladies had been assisted very ably and capably by an efficient band of workers, who left no stone unturned in order to ensure today’s success.

Lady Irvine, wife of the Lieutenant-Governor, also presents two beautiful pictures for hanging on the walls of the Higher Elementary School, in connection with the opening proceedings. One represents a Dutch girl and the other is entitled “Mother and Child.” Lady Irvine takes a keen interest in matters connected with the school. The gift of the pictures is greatly appreciated by Mr. Stewart and all those interested in the progress of the scholastic establishment.

As a finale to the day’s celebrations an enjoyable dance is to be held in the public hall in Henry Street later in the evening. The entertainment has been organised by the united efforts of district social and sporting clubs working in co-operation with the school committee. Decorations in streamers representing school colors brighten the interior of the hall, and greenery has been artistically used to tone down the brighter colors. Smart and Aumont’s orchestra (violin, piano and mandolin) are to supply the music and Mr. J. Glen will officiate in his usual capable manner as M.C.. Supper will be provided later, and the entertainment will wind up at midnight. Should be lots of fun.

Are you going to join us there?

Main entrance, Eltham High School c.1960 (Photo donated by George W. Bell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

References:

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ThrowbackThursday: Gala Opening Ball,New Public Hall, Eltham, November 21st, 1941

Photo: Eltham Hall (Artist’s impression); Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser, 28 November, 1941,  p. 3.

Introductory Card, Gala Opening Ball, New Public Hall, Eltham, Friday 21st November, 1941 (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory)

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back 77 years to November 21, 1941. Our boys have been fighting in Europe and the Middle East for almost two years now and our district has suffered losses. The headlines in today’s Argus describe a terrific attack by the RAF on posts in Libya in which our airmen assisted.   In just 16 days the Japanese will launch a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, devastating the US Navy Fleet, and catapulting us into the Pacific War, right on our very doorstep.

It is just before 8:30 p.m., the sun having set just over an hour ago. A recent Gallop poll shows people are in favour of daylight saving time two to one but we will have to wait another year till it is introduced.  We have gathered in Arthur Street at the corner with Maria Street, near the base of the steps leading up to the swanky new Eltham Public Hall and Shire Office. The lights at the top of the steps bask us in their glow. It is overcast and 58 degrees (14°C), down from the maximum of 64 (18°C) at 3 p.m.. A few showers fell in the morning but it is dry now and predicted to be a fine day tomorrow, which is good as we have a big night ahead for us. For we are about to walk up the steps and enter into the new hall for the first time to attend the Gala Opening Ball which commences in just a few minutes, finishing in the wee hours of the morning. This is going to be a grand event; the official ceremony commences at 10:30 p.m.. Everyone is dressed to the nines and the air is full of excited chatter.

Shire of Eltham Office and Hall, cnr Main Road and Arthur Street, Eltham, c.1960 (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory)

The external walls of the building are constructed with Templestowe bricks which were selected for use because of their comparatively low initial cost and because such a brick facing reduces maintenance cost to a minimum.

In a few weeks the new Shire Offices will also be ready for occupation, and for the first time since Eltham was created a Shire in 1871, its municipal business will be conducted in surroundings befitting its dignity.

The combined structure of the Hall and Offices provide Eltham with a focal point for development, and is a fine building setting an example for future improvements to the township.

The design affords convenient  and appropriate entrances to both the public hall and the Council Chambers befitting their importance whilst achieving a satisfactory linking up of the two buildings.

The Municipal Offices consist of Council Chamber, general office, rate collector’s office, secretary’s office, engineer’s office and store room. They have been designed to provide for an additional storey when warranted by future development.

The entrance hall and Council Chamber are panelled with specially selected ribbon grained Queensland walnut with all other walls sand finished internally. A feature of the Council Chamber is a fine open fire place built of Ballarat tapestry bricks. The windows are of steel frames with a section glazed with broad reeded glass for privacy.

The whole building has been roofed with “Fibrolite” which will act as an insulator and will afford effective protection against the effects of condensation on the ceilings. Internally and externally, a pleasing and lasting effect has been achieved by the restrained use of color in pastel shades.

The site upon which the buildings stand will lend itself to a satisfactory garden treatment and development, and its elevation and central position in the Town of Eltham renders it a landmark around which the shire should maintain its recent growth and development.

The hall section of the building comprises a main hall, stage, two dressing rooms, kitchen, two cloakrooms and foyer. To provide for small meetings, the men’s cloak room and foyer are divided by means of folding doors.

The kitchen is fitted out with ample cupboarding, copper, stove and power points and is insulated with fibrolite wall board.

A specially constructed brick and concrete bio cabin has been constructed above the foyer. Flush walnut veneer polished doors have been used throughout.

Right on 8:30 the doors swing open and we are embraced by the surge of people.

Passing through the doors we immediately notice how clean and bright it appears with its white walls, and Tasmanian Oak hardwood floors; not a nail in sight thanks to the secret-nail technique stipulated in the design. The interior treatment of the main hall consists of a “Masonite” dado 4ft. 6in. high above which are fibrous plaster walls and a coved fibrous plaster ceiling.

Indirect artificial lighting has been installed by the introduction of scientifically designed fibrous plaster dome reflectors which are first illuminated by metal suspension electric light fittings. These lights are supplemented by wall bracket lights. The atmosphere created adds an element of glamour in addition to the many beautiful gowns worn by the ladies and smartly dressed men.

The acoustics have been catered for through the proportions of the building in conjunction with the elimination of inside wall piers and the use of “Perfotile” sound absorbing tile wall treatment. About 300 people are already in attendance yet conversation is easy to hear.

The stage is massed with flowers and shrubs carefully arranged by Mr. W. Allen; contrasting with the striking red, white and blue of the Union Jack draped at the back. A large bowl of delphiniums sits in front of the footlights.

Four years earlier, in September 1937, a group of ladies met to form a Ladies’ Committee to assist the General Committee in raising funds for the hall. Those present were Mrs Allen, Mrs Bowman, Mrs Hickey, Mrs Rains, Mrs Boake and Mrs Lyon. As there were only six present, they elected to remain in the interim as a Social Committee to arrange catering, etc., for the two dances that had been arranged for September 29th and October 30th of that year. Both those dances proved a great success. Mrs McAdie joined the committee in October. The Ladies’ Committee was officially formed at a combined meeting of the General and Ladies’ committees held on April 6th, 1938. Mrs Boake agreed to be President, Mrs Lyon as Secretary and Mrs Rains as Assistant Secretary. Other members included Mrs Browne, Mrs Forde, Mrs Jarrold, Mrs Bradbury and Mrs Taylor.

By 1941 their numbers had grown to include Matron Wilson, and Mesdames Andrew, Brinkotter, Cloney, Walker, Parsons, Crick,  Ballenger, Travena, Hurst, Shields and Le Brocq . A number of these ladies who will eventually move on and become part of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Eltham War Memorial Trust, have been working tirelessly organising events and raising much needed funds to arrive at this special occasion today.

As we take in the splendid surroundings we overhear many complimentary remarks about the wonderful job achieved by the members of the Hall Committee and the Ladies’ Committee which had supported the General Committee over many years. Plenty of refreshments are available; there are tables laden with cakes and other treats as well as another table of cups and saucers in a Blue Willow design for those wishing to partake of a cup of tea.

At 10:30pm there is a ringing of spoons on glasses. The official opening ceremony by the Hon. W.H. Everard, M.L.A. is about to commence.

Councillor A. Brinkkotter, secretary of the Hall Committee, introduces Mr. W. Hickey, the president, and in doing so remarks that Eltham has succeeded, after many long years of fighting, in erecting a new hall and civic centre which had been badly needed.
Mr. Hickey says that although for a long time it had looked as though the erection of the building would be postponed indefinitely, at last the new hall was completed.

“It took a long time to convince the Council of the necessity for a new hall and civic centre in Eltham,” he says. “The councillors, in looking after the interests of all sections of the rate payers, could not see that such a move was necessary. But finally the Hall Committee proved that such a move was not only advisable, but would prove a financial asset to the Shire.”

“This committee had to put down £1,500 in cash before the work on the hall began, and to enable the committee to do this, residents loaned them money free of interest for 12 months. In addition the committee has guaranteed to pay the Council £100 a year for the next ten years.”

“The borrowed money has to be repaid to the lenders, and I hope that the public will realise this and support the functions which have been and will be arranged by the Hall Committee to enable them to return the money as soon, as possible.”

Councillor E. Andrew, vice-president of the Hall Committee, extends a welcome to visiting councillors from Heidelberg, and adds that he is proud to be present on such an auspicious occasion. The Hall Committee has worked for years to provide the town with such an asset, and deserved the success which had crowned their efforts.

Mr. G. L. Chandler, M.L.C., extends his own congratulations to those who had been instrumental in having such a fine hall built. Of its kind, he adds, it is the best hall in which he has ever been.

“It speaks volumes for those people who have worked for many years for the hall. I know of no other place where the residents have handed over £1,500 for the erection of a hall and guaranteed the balance of the cost. You will always find the few who say ‘Time is not opportune.’ In these days you have to make your opportunities.”

“Before any town can advance, a civic spirit must exist in the residents, and I hope the people will support the Hall Committee which has the interests of this district at heart.”

The gathered are disappointed to learn from the Shire Secretary, Mr. C.L. Tingate, that the Shire President (Councilor Price) has been kept away due to illness. Mr. Tingate recalls the fire which destroyed the old Shire Offices at Kangaroo Ground in 1934 and the opposition which then existed to the Shire Offices being transferred to Eltham.

“Had it not been that this opposition was overcome, it is doubtful if we would have been celebrating this occasion tonight. This hall is the result of years of work by a committee which has had the desire and has used every endeavour to make the town go ahead.”

Councillor Braid tells the the assembled gathering that efforts had been made for years to get Shire Offices and a Hall in Eltham, and it was only when the present committee had made a concerted effort and a wonderful offer to the Council, that their object had been achieved.

“The South Riding Councillors have been trying to avoid increasing the rate, and they have managed to erect the Shire Offices without any increase,” he says.

And now it is time for Mr. Everard to speak. Laughter erupts when he recalls that a few years ago when talking to Councillor Braid, who was then President of the Shire, he had said “I’m sick and tired of hearing the talk about your new hall. I’ll be dead and buried before there is a new hall here!”

Mr. Everard also says that he considered it was due to the efforts of six Eltham people that he was first returned to Parliament.

“A meeting was called in the old hall to discuss my campaign, and although the weather was bad and I was late, this little group waited for me and began preparations which ultimately resulted in my election to represent the district.”

Mr. Everard then declares the hall open and expresses hope that “this red letter day for Eltham” will live long in the memories of those present.

Councillor Brinkkotter returns to the stage and comments on the wonderful work done by the members of the Hall Committee in the last two weeks, fixing up the seats – all armchairs – placed around the walls of the hall. He also expresses thanks to the Ladies’ Committee for its untiring efforts in support of the Hall Committee, and on behalf of the committee he thanks the Council, the architect (A. K. Lines and MacFarlane of 440 Little Collins Street and Greensborough), the contractor (A. E. Smart of Thomastown) and all the men who had worked on the building, along with the public who had so generously assisted with the expense.

And with the speeches completed, the band starts playing again and the floor becomes alive with couples dancing while others retire to the lounge chairs.

Those present include: Mr. and Mrs. D. Lyon, Mr. and Mrs. W. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Collis, Mr. and Mrs. H. Shields, Mr. and Mrs. W. Allen, Mr. and Mrs. J. Crick, Mr. and Mrs. E. Staff, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ballenger, Mr. and Mrs. Butler, Mr. and Mrs. G. LeBrocq, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kent, Mr. and Mrs. D. McAdie, Mr. and Mrs. S. Browne, Mr. and Mrs. McNeill, Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Gillberg, Mr. and Mrs. Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. J. Bell. Mr. and Mrs. A. Parsons. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Rains, Mr. and Mrs. L. Jarrold, Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Burgoyne, Mr. and Mrs. C. Hurst, Mr. and Mrs. J. Cresp, Mr. and Mrs. S. Kirkland, Mr. and Mrs. A. Schulz, Mr. and Mrs. Bryce jnr., Mr. and Matron Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Sinclair, Mr. and Mrs. W. Squire, Mr. and Mrs. L. Iredale, Mr. and Mrs. H. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. W. Adlington.

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Tingate (representing the Shire President), Councillor and Mrs. E. Andrew, Councillor and Mrs. A. J. Braid, Councillor and Mrs. A. Brinkkotter, Councillor and Mrs. W. Clinton, Councillor and Mrs. J. L. Ryan, Councillor and Miss Lines.

The Hon. G. L. Chandler, M.L.C. and Mrs. Chandler, Mr. W. H. Everard, M.L.A.

Mesdames E. M. Boake, Allen, Pennefather, Northmore and Johnston.

Misses Beryl Northmore, Adele Peacock, Jean Glasgow, Olwyn Bryan, Mona Baker, Muriel Butler, Dorothy Butler, June Rains, I. Dudfield, Brennan, Scott, E. Bradford, Allen, S. J. Taylor, B. Simpson, A. Brookes, Somerville, Finlay, D. LaFranz, O. Parsons, E. Doney, I. Bond.

Messrs. R. Taylor, W. Boake, H. A. Davies, R. Marks, D. and J. Glasgow, Carrucan, Leo and Lou Brennan, A. Lowerson, G. Burges; K. Browne, L. Bryan, R. Wigley, L. Doney, W. North-more (R.A.A.F.), V. McColl, R. Finlay, Bryce, sen., Maclurkin, A. Smart, C. Brodie, and Dr. Bradbury.

References:

  • 1941 ‘CIVIC OPENING TONIGHT-LANDMARK IN ELTHAM HISTORY’, Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser (Vic. : 1940 – 1942), 21 November, p. 3. , viewed 15 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57495599
  • 1941 ‘OFFICIAL OPENING OF NEW CIVIC CENTRE’, Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser (Vic. : 1940 – 1942), 28 November, p. 3. , viewed 15 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57495679
  • 1941 ‘BIG MAJORITY FOR DAYLIGHT SAVING’, The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 – 1954), 13 November, p. 8. , viewed 18 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245362845
  • 1937 Formation of Eltham Public Hall Ladies Committee, 21 September 1937
  • 1940-1944 Minutes 14 March 1940 to 4 May 1944,Eltham Public Hall Ladies Committee

ThrowbackThursday: Billy Cart Derby, Easter Saturday 1957

Promotional window label, Eltham Gymkhana, Easter Saturday, 20 April 1957 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to Saturday, April 20, 1957. We are going to the Eltham Easter Gymkhana which is being held at Eltham Park. This is the ninth Eltham Show to be held in aid of the Eltham War Memorial Trust. The Trust has already built an Infant Welfare Centre which was opened five years ago in 1952 and more recently this year, a preschool centre which includes a children’s library in an annexe.

Today’s programme includes equestrian turnouts, dressage contests, and jumping events for which the newly formed Melbourne Show Jumping Club have assisted in laying out an Olympic-type course.

The Women’s Auxiliary of the trust are also running a market stall, with local produce and handcrafts.

Besides the horse show, there will be a pedigreed goat show and this year, a most thrilling soap box derby for us to see for which Mr Russell Lewis along with Mr J.M. Peter Bassett-Smith, secretary of the trust and a member of the show committee will assist in the running of.

Entry form for the Skyline Drive-In “Soap-Box” Derby, to be held along Main Road between Panorama Avenue and Bolton Street, Easter Saturday, 20 April 1957 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
[Note: entry form quotes incorrect date as 19 April, which was a Friday]
The Soap Box Derby is being sponsored this year by Hoyt’s Skyline Theatres and is to be run over a 3/4 mile long course along the main Eltham Road commencing at the eastern corner of Panorama Road and racing down the hill to the finish line at the intersection with Bolton Street. There are two divisions in this Derby; Junior, 8-13 years and Senior, 14-95 years, so let’s go join in the fun.

Billy carts in the Senior division are permitted vehicles of any size or type provided they are fitted with four wheels, adequate braking, steering and have no motor. In the Junior division the vehicles must also be no more than five feet in length and the wheels no more than 12 inches in diameter. No pneumatic tyres and needle or roller bearings are allowed.

It is now 11:00 am and the elimination heats followed by the semi-finals are about to commence. The final of each division should be conducted around 1:20 pm. Apart from the local entries, 18 Melbourne Grammar School Students are in attendance to assist in the running of the Derby.

The Starter now places the competitors on the starting line. He takes a few steps forward in front of the line of billy carts, turns to face them, raises the flag in his arm, scans the line and each competitor one final time then drops the flag. And they’re racing!

In about four minutes they will cross the finish line at Bolton Street.

The 1957 Eltham Gymkhana made a profit of £309 19s 6d, which was paid in to the Eltham War Memorial Trust fund.

Did you attend or participate in the Billy Cart Derby? Do you have any pictures or stories you would like to share with us? We would love to hear your comments and memories.

Entry form for the Skyline Drive-In “Soap-Box” Derby, to be held along Main Road between Panorama Avenue and Bolton Street, Easter Saturday, 20 April 1957 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
[Note: entry form quotes incorrect date as 19 April, which was a Friday]

References:

  • 1957, “Young Rider to Judge at Show”, The Age, Wednesday, April 17, 1957, p8
  • 1957, Your Entry Form for the Skyline Drive-In “Soap-Box” Derby
  • 1957, Minutes of Meeting of Eltham Show Committee held at La Ronde, 12 April 1957

ThrowbackThursday: It is with deep regret . . . , Old Eltham Road, Lower Plenty, May 3rd, 1941

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to Saturday, May 3rd, 1941 and the property ‘Abington’ (now known as ‘Araluen’) on the Old Eltham Road, Lower Plenty; home of Mrs Annie Castledine. It is morning and the weather is fine with a slight northerly breeze; the sun is out warming the dew off the grass following a chilly and foggy start to the day of 43 degrees (6° C) at 7am. The sun will heat the day up to a pleasant 68 (20° C) at noon but that is the only warmth to be brought to the Castledine homestead that day.

Passing through the front gate and heading up the drive, a young lad in postal office uniform, cap on head, pedals his bike up the hill. The telegram delivery boy; an unfortunate scene, and a symbol of fear, stabbing directly to the hearts of every mother, wife, father, brother, sister or child unfortunate enough to witness it.

The Castledine family home at 226 Old Eltham Road, Lower Plenty ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

Annie has heard and seen him approaching; his bicycle bell rattling as he passes over the ruts and corrugations in the drive, small puffs of dust falling from behind his wheels. She comes to the front door to greet him, her heart pounding with fear.

The boy dismounts and places his bike on its stand with respect rather than just dropping it. He wipes a bead of sweat off his forehead, straightens his cap and dusts himself down slightly. He too advances towards her but tries not to catch her eye. For unlike the slightest glimmer of hope Annie may hold, he knows what he is delivering.

He asks Annie quietly, “Mrs Annie Castledine?” Annie reaches her hand out towards him and he gently hands the sealed telegram to her. Still trying to avoid eye contact, he backs away and says, “I’m very sorry”. He quietly gets back on his bike and rides away though Annie cannot see him anymore, her eyes are full of tears.

Telegram, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne to Mrs Annie Castledine, Old Eltham Road, Lower Plenty, 3 May 1941.The telegram is oil stained as it was kept by George’s brother Sid, in his toolbox.  ( Digital scan of original held in private collection; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

“It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that VX10044 Sapper G. E. Castledine has been killed in action April 18th & desire to convey to you the profound sympathy of the Minister for the Army and the Military Board.
– Minister for the Army”

George Ernest Castledine with friend, Emily Beckett (on his left) and another unidentified friend, c.1939 ( Photo donated by Joan Castledine; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

George is the first soldier from the Shire of Eltham to be killed in the war. He was engaged to Miss Jean Simonson of Montmorency and was going to turn 27 in just two week’s time. He had much to live for. His older brother Sid, 28, enlisted only four week’s ago.

Annie’s world and those of her other children are changed forever.

Sapper George Ernest Castledine (1914-1941), son of Arthur Frederick (dec.) and Annie Castledine, enlisted 23 January 1940 at Lower Plenty and was assigned to the 2/2 Field Company. He is buried in the Phaleron War Cemetery, Athens, Greece and is remembered on the Roll of Honour located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall.

Grave of Sapper George Ernest Castledine, Phaleron War Cemetery, Athens, Greece ( Photo donated by Joan Castledine; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Grave of Sapper George Ernest Castledine, Phaleron War Cemetery, Athens, Greece ( Photo donated by Joan Castledine; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

George’s brother Sid, upon his discharge from active duty was to keep that fateful telegram in his tool box, a personal place near and dear to him, for the remainder of his life.

It is in memory of George and all the other fallen soldiers of our district that the Eltham Women’s Auxiliary first banded together to raise funds for the establishment of the Eltham War Memorial as a living memorial to ‘be a constant reminder of those who fought for us and the little ones for whom they fought and died.’

LEST WE FORGET

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

ROLL OF HONOUR
1914-1918
  • Sgt. George Williams
  • Sgt. Reginald E. Sims
  • L/Cpl. George Moore
  • L/Cpl. Henry G. Philips
  • L/Cpl. John C. Bell
  • Pte. Geoffrey Grant
  • Pte. George Sommerville
  • Pte. George Brown
  • Pte. John Brown
  • Pte. William Bond
  • Pte. Thomas Cameron
  • Pte. Alfred Cassells
  • Pte. Robert Meadows
  • Pte. Walter Mosley
  • Pte. James Pryor
  • Pte. William Prior
  • Pte. Edward Barrett
  • Pte. William Crellin
  • Pte. Henry Norman
  • Pte. Edward Bird
  • Pte. Arthur Brown
  • Pte. Roslyn Stevens
  • Pte. Herbert Creed
  • Pte. Charles Bromfield
  • Pte. Kenneth Sharp
  • Pte. Henry McAlary
1939-1945
  • Capt. S.M. Gahan
  • Plt. Off. D. Rutter
  • Flt. Off. D.H. Rutter
  • Flt. Sgt. S.M. Mclean
  • Flt. Sgt. L. Ingram
  • Sgt. C.D. Dunlop
  • Cpl. T. Feldbauer
  • Cpl. A.C. Clerke
  • Spr. G.E. Castledine
  • Pte. J. Butherway
  • Pte. K.F. Field

Soldiers of the Shire of Eltham remembered on the Eltham Roll of Honour for their supreme sacrifice; located in the Eltham War Memorial Hall

Reference:

1941 ‘OBITUARY’, Eltham and Whittlesea Shires Advertiser (Vic. : 1940 – 1942), 9 May, p. 2. , viewed 24 Oct 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57494302

ThrowbackThursday: ArtStreams Magazine, 1996-2005

A sample of ArtStreams magazines from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back October 1996. The former Shire of Eltham Municipal Offices building has recently been bulldozed and razed from existence. A planning permit has been issued to build a shop, petrol station and community facility on the site and the Eltham Community Action Group has just been formed as a consequence.

Peter Dougherty who has been involved in the local art scene for many years has just established a new arts magazine, ArtStreams, for which he acts as publisher and editor. Volume 1, No. 1, November 1996 edition has just gone on sale. Peter’s comments on the various branches of the arts are widely respected. His “The Arts” column in the Diamond Valley Leader presents a brief summary for a much wider cross section of the local community. Peter also operates his own gallery and the Artstreams Cafe at the St Andrews market. Peter has a wealth of knowledge about present day and historical aspects of local art and artists.

Unfortunately the recent events were too close to publication to reference in the inaugural issue but his editorial comment published in the second issue is reproduced below.

Scrapbook album created 1997 by a member of the Eltham Community Action Group in participation with various artists, writers, local business people and other local citizens, which was sent to Planning Minister Maclellan in protest of proposed plans to sell the former Eltham Shire Office site at 895 Main Road Eltham to develop a Shell Service Station and Hungry Jacks fast food outlet. The purpose was to express what is unique about the character of Eltham, why people live and work there and why such a development would be out of character and inappropriate for the Eltham Gateway along with alternative development proposals. This protest was the catalyst for the formation of the Eltham Community Action Group. (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

ArtStreams magazine was published for ten years. In all there were ten volumes commencing with Vol. 1, No. 1, November 1996 and finishing with Vol 10. No. 5, Summer Edition 2005-06.

Eltham District Historical Society is very fortunate to hold a complete set of Volumes 1-9 and recently they have been digitised in their entirety and will prove to be an extremely valuable resource for researching our local art and cultural scene. However, we are missing all five issues from Volume 10, the final volume published.

Do you have, or know of someone who may have issues from Volume 10 who would be willing to donate them to us to complete our collection, or at least loan them to us for digitisation? We would be most appreciative of the opportunity to complete this wonderful collection and build upon the resource it will offer to our community.

Notice of Applications for Planning Permit, 895 Main Road, Eltham, September 1996 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Scrapbook album created 1997 by a member of the Eltham Community Action Group in participation with various artists, writers, local business people and other local citizens, which was sent to Planning Minister Maclellan in protest of proposed plans to sell the former Eltham Shire Office site at 895 Main Road Eltham to develop a Shell Service Station and Hungry Jacks fast food outlet. The purpose was to express what is unique about the character of Eltham, why people live and work there and why such a development would be out of character and inappropriate for the Eltham Gateway along with alternative development proposals. This protest was the catalyst for the formation of the Eltham Community Action Group. (from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

 

“my word”, Peter Dougherty, ArtStreams, Dec 1996-Jan 1997, p2
The vacating of the former Eltham shire office building presented an opportunity for the Shire of Nillumbik to use it to serve the needs of the community. The loss of the building presents the opportunity to replace it with one which will serve those needs and provide a visual welcome to the township of Eltham.

Whatever is built on that site will become the new face of Eltham and form part of the library-Shillinglaw Cottage mini environment. The commissioners have apparently decided that a hamburger joint, petrol station and video store will do the job.

Looked at from a needs perspective these uses are hard to justify. Eltham has a petrol station on the corner of Mt Pleasant Road, another in Bridge Street and two on the main road heading north. There can’t be too many cars on the road that couldn’t make it from any of these to another without refuelling.

The community is already well served in the area of fast food services, and if another hamburger outlet is really needed it could probably be accommodated within the existing shopping centre. With the arrival of cable TV, it would appear that video rental is not likely to be a spectacular growth industry and the community is already well served.

So what does Eltham need?

The Shire Council is launching a strategy to attract more tourism into the region with hopes of generating $27 million annually. Currently the tourism dollar is earned from such sources as St Andrews Market, Montsalvat, Sugarloaf Reservoir, the Diamond Valley Railway and a growing wine industry.

With careful marketing more income may be obtainable from these areas, but shouldn’t we also be looking closely at our other already recognised regional assets. Now could be the time to utilise the depth of creative talent and expertise which resides in the shire.

Nillumbik has many performing artists who, due to lack of facilities, always work outside the area, and visual artists in all fields who exhibit elsewhere because there are not enough suitable venues at home. With the best will in the world those working in the Shire’s arts areas cannot stretch the present facilities to meet the demand.

Political will to explore other possibilities was lacking when the decision was made to hand part of Montsalvat’s grounds over to the cemetery. This action severely diminished Montsalvat’s viability as a venue and led inevitably to the loss of the Jazz Festival and the prestige and income that it brought to Nillumbik.

A bold decision now could redress some of this loss and add to Nillumbik’s potential in the cultural tourism area without putting too much pressure on the environmental and ecological treasures which at present constitute so much of our major tourism assets.

 

References:
  • Eltham District Historical Society Newsletter No. 161, March 2005
  • “my word”, Peter Dougherty, ArtStreams, Dec 1996-Jan 1997, p2

ThrowbackThursday: Demolition of Eltham Shire Offices, August 1996

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to August 2nd, 1996 and 895 Main Road, Eltham, to the former Municipal Offices of the Shire of Eltham.

Eltham – Shire Office, at time of Main Road widening (formerly site of Shillinglaw Cottage), 1968. (Source: Shire of Eltham; from the Shire of Eltham Pioneers Photograph Collection No. 657 held jointly by Eltham District Historical Society and Yarra Plenty Regional Library.)

The Shire offices were opened in 1965 and extended in 1971 to establish the Eltham Library. The final meeting of the Eltham Shire Council was held in December 1994 before the forced amalgamations of municipal councils by the Kennett Government resulted in the cessation of the Shire’s existence after 125 years.  In July 1996 the State Government appointed Commissioners (1994-1996) made the decision to demolish the former Eltham Shire offices without any community consultation.

Eltham Shire Offices southern wing showing the Eltham Library, 1985-1986 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Eltham Shire Offices, 1985-1986 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Shillinglaw trees from the safety compound: Demolition of the Shire of Eltham Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Shillinglaw trees from the safety compound: Demolition of the Shire of Eltham Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

The demolition works started within 24 hours of that decision being made. It is claimed the building contains asbestos. However none of the workers or numerous other onlookers are wearing any protective gear as the heavy machinery batters our once proud building into submission. The rubble is simply dumped into open bins and dump trucks.

Dump trucks shuttle in to collect rubble; Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Dump trucks shuttle in to collect rubble; Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

Ultimately our land is sold to a developer, which precipitates a dramatic trail of community angst, threats of legal action, rescinding of the sale and the sacking of a newly elected council and several unsuccessful development proposals, by subsequent councils.

Back to the future and after all these years the vacant site is still there, still under threat (along with the Eltham War Memorial complex of buildings), still part of the soul of our community, still guarded by the three trees once outside the front of the Shillinglaw Cottage, providing a navigational beacon from past to present and onward we entrust, integral to the soul and heartbeat of Eltham; a treasured part our children’s future when they in turn look back to where their roots sprung from.

Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, 2 August 1996 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, 2 August 1996 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, 2 August 1996 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, 2 August 1996 ( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Fred Mitchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Beryl Martin; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Fred Mitchell; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )
Demolition of Eltham Sire Offices, 895 Main Road, Eltham, August 1996 ( Photo: Harry Gilham; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

 

 

 

 

ThrowbackThursday: Springtime Fair, Eltham Hall, 4 Oct 1946

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to Friday, 4th October 1946. The town is a buzz with excitement as the Women’s Auxiliary to the Eltham War Memorial Trust have arranged for a Springtime Fair to be held in the Eltham Hall this afternoon, which is expected to continue into the evening.

The Fair is a special effort undertaken by the Women’s Auxiliary to raise funds for the establishment of the memorial, which is to take the form of a Baby Health Centre, Children’s Creche and Library. A block of land in a splendid position was recently purchased as the site on which the community centre will be built.

Mrs Cairns Officer is president of the Trust and chairman of the Women’s Auxiliary. Mesdames Dagnall and Tlngate are the honorary secretaries.

Cake Stall at the Eltham Fair c. 1940s. L-R: Mesdames Nation, Squire, Boyd, Edwards, Carroll, Battye and Brown
( from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society @elthamhistory )

 

Note:

The Eltham War Memorial building precinct is located at 903-907 Main Road, Eltham. The Memorial spans the area between Main Road and the railway line and is owned and managed by Nillumbik Shire Council (formerly Eltham Shire Council). It contains the  Eltham Maternal and Infant Welfare Centre, Eltham Food Share, the former Children’s Library (now War Memorial Hall) and Eltham Pre-School. The precinct also contains the Senior Citizen’s Centre though this was never part of the original Eltham War Memorial Trust buildings. The complex was developed by the Eltham War Memorial Trust Inc., as a form of living memorial as a ‘constant reminder to us of those who fought for us and the little ones for whom they fought and died’.

Reference:

1946 ‘FAIR FOR ELTHAM’ MEMORIAL’, The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 – 1954), 4 October, p. 14. , viewed 17 Oct 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245527598