ThrowbackThursday: Eltham Railway Station, 17 July 1983

#ThrowbackThursday – Over the years there have been a number of various electric train models that have traveled the Hurstbridge line to Eltham. Today we time travel back 36 years to 17 July 1983 and Eltham Railway Station where we have the unique experience to witness four generations of electric train all lined up together.

Four generations of electric trains at Eltham Railway Station, 17 July 1983
L-R: Tait (Red Rattler) wooden bodied train (1919-1952); Comeng stainless steel bodied train (1981 to curr.); Hitachi stainless steel bodied train (1972-2014); Harris (Blue) steel bodied train (1956-1988)
(Photo: George Coop, from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

The railway line to Eltham first opened in 1902. In those days the trains were all hauled by steam locomotives but in April 1923 the line was electrified and the first electric trains commenced service to Eltham. Those initial electric trains were a Tait wooden body design first introduced in 1910 to be hauled by steam locomotives and converted to electric from 1919. The Tait trains were manufactured from 1909 to 1952. There were a number of different versions; swing doors and sliding doors and all had beautifully appointed interiors. Of course most people referred to them as ‘Red Rattlers’.

Interior of a Red Rattler Tait train, 22 August 1983
(Photo: George Coop, from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)

The Harris (Blue) steel bodied train was introduced 1956 and operated until 1988 when the final trains were withdrawn from service. They had an ignominious ending as these trains were full of asbestos. They were wrapped up in plastic and buried in landfill near Clayton.

In 1981 Comeng stainless steel bodied trains were first introduced to replace the last of the Tait trains and these underwent refurbishment between 2000-2003. Some examples currently still remain in service.

Hitachi stainless steel bodied trains were operated on the Melbourne network between 1972-2014.

In 2003 orders were placed for a mixture of Siemens Nexas  and Alstom X’Trapolis 100 units. Braking issues plagued the Siemens model with subsequent orders being directed towards the X’Trapolis model.

This week in the news we saw that French train manufacturer Alstom who produces the X’Trapolis model electric train in Ballarat has a new X’Trapolis 2.0 model ready to be introduced to replace the ageing Comeng electric trains by 2026.

 

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Heritage Walk: Exploring Lower Plenty – 6 July, 2019

Meet at 2.00 pm (Melway ref 33 B1) at the corner of Bonds and Stawell Roads, Lower Plenty. (Street parking is available in Montpelier Drive)

The predominant feature of this walk in the Bonds Road area, Lower Plenty is the large number of magnificent old River Red Gums that line the route. These trees are of the spreading woodland form of this species indicating that they must have been originally growing in a reasonably open setting. The walk also includes parts of the historic Cleveland Estate and the homestead “Rosehill” established by pioneer farmer Henry Stooke. The walk distance is about 3km and will take 2 to 2.5 hours.

This area was the site of the first recorded European settlement in what was to become the Shire of Eltham when the Willis brothers arrived in the late 1830s. From the southern part of Cleveland Avenue there are extensive views across and along the Yarra Valley.

The walk is open to Society members and the general public. Dogs are not permitted on Society excursions. The phone number for contact on the day is 0409 021 063.

All are welcome…..but numbers are limited

ThrowbackThursday: Station Master’s House, Eltham Railway Station, 21 August 1983

#ThrowbackThursday – Today we time travel back to 21 August 1983 and the access road to the Eltham Railway Station (present day St Laurence Lane). We are standing near the Post Office (now Eltham Newsagency) and the Country Art Store (now Platform 3095) looking north east in the direction of Pryor Street. In the distance behind the trees and across the road we can see the State Bank of Victoria (now Westpac) and the Commonwealth Bank on the opposite corner of Pryor Street. Right in front of us is the former Eltham Station Master’s house which is situated in what is the present day short term car park and bus bay. The most tangible evidence of what remains is the spotted gum standing in front of the house to our right.

Station Master’s House, Eltham Railway Station, 21 August 1983. The Commonwealth Bank on the corner of Pryor Street and Main Road can be seen past the Spotted Gum that remains today in what is now the short term car park and bus bay (Photo: George Coop; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)
View from St Laurence Lane of the short term car park and bus bay at Eltham Railway Station. The only link to the former Eltham Station Master’s house is the Spotted Gum (Google Street View April 2018)
Station Master’s House, Eltham Railway Station, 21 August 1983. The State Bank of Victoria can be seen in the distance across Main Road (Photo: George Coop; from the collection of Eltham District Historical Society)